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Digital Health #Mhealth Funding Shatters Funding Records Despite #COVID Economy – SPONSOR: CardioComm Solutions $EKG.ca $ATE.ca $TLT.ca $OGI.ca $ACST.ca $IPA.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 3:40 PM on Monday, July 6th, 2020

SPONSOR: CardioComm Solutions (EKG: TSX-V) – The heartbeat of cardiovascular medicine and telemedicine. Patented systems enable medical professionals, patients, and other healthcare professionals, clinics, hospitals and call centres to access and manage patient information in a secure and reliable environment.

Digital Health Funding Shatters Funding Records Despite COVID Economy

  • Despite COVID-19, digital health funding shattered all previous venture capital funding records for the sector by raising $6.3 billion in the first half of the year (1H), according to Mercom Capital Group.
  • The Austin, TX-based firm reported that the digital health funding in 1H was 24% higher than the $5.1 billion the space raised in the first half of 2019, despite the pandemic disrupting the economy

By: Amanda Pedersen

Despite COVID-19, digital health funding shattered all previous venture capital funding records for the sector by raising $6.3 billion in the first half of the year (1H), according to Mercom Capital Group.

The Austin, TX-based firm reported that the digital health funding in 1H was 24% higher than the $5.1 billion the space raised in the first half of 2019, despite the pandemic disrupting the economy. Mercom Capital Group is previewewed this data in advance of its upcoming 1H Digital Health Funding and M&A Report, which is expected to be published July 13.

Interestingly enough, venture funding reached $2.8 billion during the second quarter of 2020, an 11% decrease year-over-year compared to $3.1 billion raised in Q2 2019. Healthcare practice-centric digital health companies received 34% of the funding in Q2 2020, raising $947 million in 56 deals, and consumer-centric digital health companies accounted for 66% of the funding, raising $1.8 billion in 105 deals.

“Adoption of digital health technologies and products have accelerated since the COVID-19 outbreak, which is reflected in the funding spike in the first half of the year. Telehealth hype has been backed by $2 billion in venture funding with no signs of slowing down,” said Raj Prabhu, CEO of Mercom Capital Group.

This confirms what MD+DI has previously reported regarding telemedicine trends that emerged during the early days of the pandemic.

Other categories that received significant funding during the second quarter include mHealth apps, analytics, wellness, and medical imaging, Mercom reported.

The top-funded digital health categories in 1H 2020 were: telehealth with $1.9 billion, followed by analytics with $826 million, mHealth apps with $794 million, clinical decision support with $545 million, healthcare service booking with $326, and wearable sensors with $321 million.

The top telehealth VC deals in 1H 2020 included: $194 million raised by Amwell (formerly American Well), $155 million raised by KRY, $144 million raised by Zhiyun Health, $100 million raised by Mindstrong, and $93 million raised by Virta Health. Telehealth funding was distributed in 85 companies during 1H 2020.

The top overall digital health VC deals in 1H 2020 included: $285 million raised by ClassPass, $250 million raised by Alto Pharmacy, $194 million raised by Amwell, $155 million raised by KRY, and $150 million raised by Concerto HealthAI. Digital Health funding was distributed in 27 different countries in 1H 2020.

Mercom Capital Group is a global communications and consulting firm that produces funding and market intelligence reports covering a variety of “cleantech” sectors.

Source: https://www.mddionline.com/digital-health/digital-health-funding-shatters-funding-records-despite-covid-economy

#Covid19 Impact on #Mhealth Applications Market is Estimated to Reach USD 100.2 billion by 2023 – SPONSOR: CardioComm Solutions $EKG.ca $ATE.ca $TLT.ca $OGI.ca $ACST.ca $IPA.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 5:42 PM on Thursday, June 25th, 2020

SPONSOR: CardioComm Solutions (EKG: TSX-V) – The heartbeat of cardiovascular medicine and telemedicine. Patented systems enable medical professionals, patients, and other healthcare professionals, clinics, hospitals and call centres to access and manage patient information in a secure and reliable environment.

Covid19 Impact on mHealth Applications Market is Estimated to Reach USD 100.2 billion by 2023

  • As per Market Research Future (MRFR), the global mHealth applications market is expected to reach USD 100.2 billion from 2017 to 2023
  • Global mHealth applications market is primarily driven by the increasing adoption of advanced technologies in healthcare sector and the need to reduce long waiting periods for specialists to access healthcare facilities

mHealth is one of the most advanced and disruptive trends in the healthcare sector that has been expanding at an exceptional rate over the last few years. mHealth changes the way traditional medical practices take place and creates a path for the future of healthcare. mHealth helps to track and manage health-related practices by using technologies such as Bluetooth, mobile network (GSM/ GPRS/3G/4 G), and Wi-Fi. Data collected by mHealth devices, such as mobile phones, tablets, laptops, and tablets, help medical professionals, consumers, and other users.

mHealth Applications Market Dynamics

The global mHealth applications market is primarily driven by the increasing adoption of advanced technologies in healthcare sector and the need to reduce long waiting periods for specialists to access healthcare facilities. The availability of mobile applications for users is experiencing rapid growth, particularly in healthcare applications that help consumers manage their illnesses, well-being, and chronic conditions. This increased role of patients, coupled with the increasing importance of keeping up-to-date information about their own health decisions, has contributed to an increase in the global adoption of mHealth applications.

The healthcare industry has moved towards a value-based care model, with mHealth becoming a widespread trend due to the advent of technologies such as remote monitoring, electronic medical records, and other communication platforms. The rising prevalence of disorders such as diabetes, hypertension, cancer, and obesity, as well as raising awareness of wellness and other preventive measures among patients, are expected to fuel the growth of the mHealth application industry.

The introduction of wearable devices from Fitbit, Apple, and Xiaomi have a positive impact on the market. Market growth appears to be positive, with increasing investment in wearable technology start-ups. These start-ups focus on categories of mHealth, such as personal safety, women’s health, and hydration monitoring, which promise exciting market prospects.

mHealth Applications Market Segmentation

The global market for mHealth applications has been segmented based on type, which includes monitoring applications, education & awareness, healthcare management, diagnosis & treatment, wellness & prevention, and others. The monitoring application segment had the largest market share of approximately 53.8% in 2016.

mHealth Applications Market Regional Analysis

Region-wise,the global mHealth applications market has been segmented into Europe, North America, Asia Pacific, and Middle East & Africa.

In 2016, Europe had the highest market share of 31.7% in the global market for mHealth applications, taking into account the regional market scenario.

The Asia Pacific is the second-largest and fastest-growing market in the global market for mHealth applications. APAC is forecast to rise at 33.7% CAGR in 2017-2023. Many Asian countries are adopting digital health strategies to manage healthcare delivery and deliver better outcomes. For example, the Digital India program aims to improve IT services to empower healthcare professionals. These initiatives are expected to make the Asia Pacific the fastest-growing segment in the forecast period.

North America is one of the leaders in the field of mhealth and is only behind the APAC. North America is estimated to cross USD 28762.1 million by 2023.

The Middle East and Africa were valued at USD 1334.9 in 2016 and is expected to rise at a steady pace over the forecast period.

Source: https://www.medgadget.com/2020/06/covid19-impact-on-mhealth-applications-market-is-estimated-to-reach-usd-100-2-billion-by-2023-size-share-clinical-health-data-stress-management-advance-technology-global-growth-factors-and-demand.html

Could #COVID19 be telehealth’s big moment? #Mhealth – SPONSOR: CardioComm Solutions $EKG.ca – $ATE.ca $TLT.ca $OGI.ca $ACST.ca $IPA.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 11:27 AM on Thursday, May 14th, 2020

SPONSOR: CardioComm Solutions (EKG: TSX-V) – The heartbeat of cardiovascular medicine and telemedicine. Patented systems enable medical professionals, patients, and other healthcare professionals, clinics, hospitals and call centres to access and manage patient information in a secure and reliable environment.

Could COVID-19 be telehealth’s big moment?

  • Over the five-year period that the analysis looks at, the U.S. telehealth market could see a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 38.2%
  • This year alone, the analysts expect the market to experience year-over-year growth of 64.3%

By Sean Whooley

Frost & Sullivan announced today that recent analysis finds that the demand for telehealth technology is expected to rise amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

The analysis, titled “Telehealth — A Technology-Based Weapon in the War Against the Coronavirus, 2020,” revealed that, as COVID-19 continues to disrupt the practice of medicine and the delivery of healthcare, the U.S. telehealth market will experience seven-fold growth by 2025.

Over the five-year period that the analysis looks at, the U.S. telehealth market could see a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 38.2%. This year alone, the analysts expect the market to experience year-over-year growth of 64.3%.

“The critical need for social distancing among physicians and patients will drive unprecedented demand for telehealth, which involves the use of communication systems and networks to enable either a synchronous or asynchronous session between the patient and provider,” Frost & Sullivan healthcare principal analyst Victor Camlek said in a news release. “However, all stakeholders need to remember that many people use the terms ‘telehealth’ or ‘telemedicine’ without understanding the ecosystem that is involved. This study will clarify the many components that are needed in order to implement telehealth.”

Camlek said that virtual visits and remote patient monitoring will propel the telehealth market, then mHealth and personal emergency response systems will come into play as well.

The analysis hypothesizes that the opportunity for telehealth to become the standard of care is growing amid the pandemic and the main challenge for providers is the capabilities for scaling up during the increase in demand.

Frost & Sullivan expects growth to be sustained beyond the pandemic by vendors who deliver user-friendly sensors, practical applications of artificial intelligence, interactive virtual assistants and robotics, as well as use of big data analytics and adherence to cybersecurity, among other things.

Source: https://www.medicaldesignandoutsourcing.com/could-covid-19-be-telehealths-big-moment/

How is #COVID19 Impacting the #Mhealth Sector? – SPONSOR: CardioComm Solutions $EKG.ca – $ATE.ca $TLT.ca $OGI.ca $ACST.ca $IPA.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 9:00 PM on Monday, May 11th, 2020

SPONSOR: CardioComm Solutions (EKG: TSX-V) – The heartbeat of cardiovascular medicine and telemedicine. Patented systems enable medical professionals, patients, and other healthcare professionals, clinics, hospitals and call centres to access and manage patient information in a secure and reliable environment.

How is COVID-19 Impacting the mHealth Sector?

 

– COVID-19 is set to challenge the traditional working of the healthcare domain and push it towards an expedited adoption of digital health.

– The one thing that is certain amidst this time after the pandemic impact has ended, we all will be left with structural changes in ways healthcare works.

By Prateek Saxena

As you read, COVID-19 is shutting down one nation after another. Around the globe, the coronavirus pandemic is having an unprecedented effect on daily lives. The virus has contacted every single sector as part of its dire impact on the global economy.

But its impact on the healthcare sector has been seismic. 

COVID-19 is set to challenge the traditional working of the healthcare domain and push it towards an expedited adoption of digital health. 

The value of digital approaches which are designed to help health professionals and the public stay up to date about the disease, maintain communication, and allow better strategic planning are now being highlighted more than ever before. 

The one thing that is certain amidst this time after the pandemic impact has ended, we all will be left with structural changes in ways healthcare works. Although these changes were happening, they were piecemeal. COVID-19 is everything that is needed to expedite the process and bring upon the digital transformation. 

Here’s a detailed read on the coronavirus impact on healthcare industry. 

How is mHealth changing?

Medical Distancing: To counter COVID-19 outbreak, key authorities like the WHO and CDC have been lobbying for ways to lower physical contact between the healthcare providers and patients, also known as medical distancing. 

Telehealth service is becoming a force in the efforts to lower healthcare-specific COVID-19 transmission. It’s effectiveness has been acting as a promising one for areas including dermatology, cardiology, and diabetic care, etc. which allows high-quality remote care, all the while saving the time and physical space. 

Even though telehealth has established itself as a great measure to back up medical distancing, there are certain barriers that have to be addressed. There are issues around patient characteristics like educational background and age, etc, uncertainties around the legal liabilities, in addition to issues of confidentiality and privacy. 

Healthcare app development companies, however, have taken notes and are working on eradicating these issues. 

Crowdsourced disease monitoring: the high surge of coronavirus crisis are highlighting the need of timely tracking the infected and their contacts. Flexibility and timeliness are known to be the two common weaknesses in the surveillance systems.  

Digital health experts, through the mode of coronavirus tracing applications, make it possible to crowdsource disease monitoring. People from across the world put in their data – their travel routes, prospect of them having caught the virus, etc. for the healthcare agencies to track the hotspots and carriers. 

Health Information Exchange to boost interoperability: Because of the pandemic and the overcrowding of patients and health facilities, a strong health data exchange has become a key in the health infrastructure. It has also shown us that ‘health data’ shouldn’t just consist of patients’ medical data but also consist of a wide data type coming in from individual’s offline and online activity. 

We are going to see a lot more HIEs becoming open and un-localized. There will be many portals coming into existence for the patients and health systems to access the files. 

“With the coronavirus exploding in communities and overwhelming hospitals nationwide, we need to help doctors and nurses on the front lines get the information they need now to stop the spread of this virus and save lives,’’ Allen Byington, co-founder of HIE Networks said. “There has never been a greater need for easy, seamless communications in health care.”

Surging demand for health gadgets: The coronavirus impact on healthcare sector has been a seismic wave of wellbeing awareness and anxiety. The fear of infection has expedited the adoption of applications and wearable as a mode of making people feel protected. Wearables are giving people accurate feedback on their blood pressure, body temperature, and health signals which are restoring the sense of control in people in addition to helping them track their health. 

In addition to the rising demand and usage of wearable for preventive measures, the users are also adopting them for being fit and keeping up with their fitness goals that they have set for themselves. 

Companies using technology to track, test, and treat COVID-19

  1. Apple & Google announced their plan to launch APIs which would enable interoperability between Android and iOS products. The two companies are also committed to developing bluetooth-based contact training features in their underlying operating systems. They believe that it would provide deeper data integration with the governments’ public health initiatives and health apps. 
  2. Walgreens has expanded its telehealth program in a way that it includes COVID-19 risk assessment, information on the clinical trials, etc. The platform also includes a website and mobile health application to help patients navigate telehealth providers and health systems so that they can connect with nurses and doctors. 
  3. The Kingdom of Bahrain has developed a COVID-19 tracking system which depends on the GPS tracking electronic bracelets and coronavirus contact tracing application. The system then alerts the government monitoring station when the infected individual leaves isolation. 
  4. Acute care and SCP Health declared their partnership for providing scalable emergency service and hospital medicine through telemedicine 
  5. Jefferson Health system laid a partnership with LifeLink for launching former’s chatbot across LifeLink’s 14 Philadelphia locations. The chabot would make use of AI for aiding pre-screen of coronavirus outbreak. The patients can also make use of the bot for figuring out the right approach of their treatment. 

In conclusion: The post-coronavirus digital health

The after-COVID world is going to be remembered as when medical interactions such as a provision to primary care or management of several non-communicable diseases transferred to digital mode, by default, as opposed to exceptions. While we had very little impact on how coronavirus impacts the global digital health industry, the post-COVID19 world will see us accepting digital health as the new normal. 

The new age will also likely enable other technologies like 5G, AI, IoT, etc. to help us all converge in a completely new variety of approaches. In this global pandemic, we are witnessing this happening in real-time and in a never-imaginable pace. 

In England, primary care has now started finally embracing telehealth and has been delivering a digital first approach as a mode to manage streaming care to the appropriate places. 

However, there’s plenty left to be done. There is a need for incorporation of a robust governance in deployment of these approaches. There should also be a robust clinic decision support within our deployments as a rule in place of exceptions. 

The next important alteration which can be seen accelerating is an adoption of precision health: both in personalised and predictive health setup. We will see the utilization of digital technology in empowering the people to self-manage themselves in case of non-communicable disease. 

Additionally, we have to understand that this new world of medical infrastructure will be very different from the health and care world we are used to. It would require us to remain open and adaptive. There is one thing guaranteed – the digital health world is going to change for the good.

Source: https://appinventiv.com/blog/coronavirus-impact-on-mhealth/

#Mhealth Study to Test Cardiac Effects of Potential COVID-19 Treatment – SPONSOR: CardioComm Solutions $EKG.ca – $ATE.ca $TLT.ca $OGI.ca $ACST.ca $IPA.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 9:35 AM on Friday, April 24th, 2020

SPONSOR: CardioComm Solutions (EKG: TSX-V) – The heartbeat of cardiovascular medicine and telemedicine. Patented systems enable medical professionals, patients, and other healthcare professionals, clinics, hospitals and call centres to access and manage patient information in a secure and reliable environment.

mHealth Study to Test Cardiac Effects of Potential COVID-19 Treatment

A French study will use a smartwatch and mHealth platform to monitor ECG data from COVID-19 patients being treated with hydroxychloroquine, a potential therapy for the Coronavirus but one that may have serious side effects.

  • An mHealth study being launched in France will use an mHealth wearable to monitor cardiac activity in COVID-19 patients being treated with hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin, a drug therapy eyes as a potential treatment for the Coronavirus.

Source: ThinkStock

By Eric Wicklund

April 22, 2020 – An mHealth study being launched in France will use an mHealth wearable to monitor cardiac activity in COVID-19 patients being treated with hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin, a drug therapy eyes as a potential treatment for the Coronavirus.

Researchers at the University Hospital of Marseille will be using a smartwatch develop by Withings and integrated with an AI-based mHealth platform developed by Boston-and-Paris-based Cardiologs. The platform is designed to remotely monitor a user’s ECG data for QT prolongation.

“A significant QT prolongation can lead to ventricular arrhythmia and potentially deadly consequences” Laurent Fiorina, a cardiologist at the Institut Cardiovasculaire Paris Sud (ICPS) and Cardiologs executive who helped launch the study, said in a press release. “It is thus important to closely monitor the QT interval during this treatment.”

“The objective of our study is to evaluate a new method for QT measurement using Cardiologs’ AI-based solution and ECG data collected via smartwatches,” added Professor Jean-Claude Deharo, head of the cardiac arrhythmia department at the University Hospital of Marseille and the principal investigator of the study. “Smartwatches are already used in the clinical setting but do not have validated QT analysis available. Combining these technologies will enable clinicians to overcome the practical limitations in the context of COVID-19 of the standard cardiac safety strategy that requires heavy patient interaction.”

Often used to prevent or treat malaria caused by mosquito bites, hydroxychloroquine has be held up by several people – including President Donald Trump – as a potential means of treating the Coronavirus. But many in the healthcare industry have pointed out the drug’s potentially dangerous side effect.

Researchers are hoping to determine whether the treatment does pose a threat to a patient’s health – and whether this platform can be used in other non-COVID-19 treatments.

“This study has implications for risk management of drug-induced cardiotoxicity, even beyond the current COVID-19 and hydroxychloroquine context,” Professor Jag Singh, a cardiologist at Massachusetts General Hospital, Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and scientific advisor to Cardiologs, said in the press release. “Personal ECG sensors could potentially find a role in the management of these patients, but also add value in other routine clinical care, since over 300 commonly used drugs may have similar QT-prolongation risks as hydroxychloroquine.”

Source: https://mhealthintelligence.com/news/mhealth-study-to-test-cardiac-effects-of-potential-covid-19-treatment

CLIENT FEATURE: CardioComm Solutions $EKG.ca – Putting Your Heartbeat Into The Cloud For Instant Diagnostics $ATE.ca $TLT.ca $OGI.ca $ACST.ca $IPA.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 12:40 PM on Friday, April 3rd, 2020

Global Leaders in Mobile  ECG Connectivity

  • 20 years of medical credibility licensing technologies to hospitals, physicians, remote patient monitoring  platforms, research groups and commercial call centers
  • Sold into > 20 countries, with the largest customer base located in the US
  • Class II medical device clearances and device agnostic for collecting, viewing, recording, analyzing and  storing of ECGs for management of patient and consumer health
  • ECG solutions for both consumer (OTC) and medical (Rx) markets
  • Owns all IP and source code
  • Market expert contributor for reports in m‐health, mobile cardiac monitoring and new advances in  consumer health and wellness monitoring

Recent Highlights

CardioComm Solutions Partners with CareOS to Bring Consumer ECG Monitoring into the Connected Home

  • Entered into a partnership agreement with CareOS SAS (France), a subsidiary of Baracoda Group, to provide consumer ECG monitoring technologies through the CareOS Poseidon smart mirror health and beauty hub
  • The partnership will see CardioComm’s FDA and Health Canada cleared GEMS™ ECG management software and Smart Monitoring ECG reading service integrated into the touch and gesture controlled smart mirror
  • GEMSTM software will be capable of recognizing ECG devices made by multiple device manufacturers which will permit CareOS customers more options in choosing a device of their preference.

Industry News

Company Accolades

FULL DISCLOSURE: CardioComm Solutions Inc. is an advertising client of AGORA Internet Relations Corp.

#Mhealth Project to Crowdsource Consumer Data for #Coronavirus Research – SPONSOR: CardioComm Solutions $EKG.ca – $ATE.ca $TLT.ca $OGI.ca $ACST.ca $IPA.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 11:49 AM on Wednesday, April 1st, 2020

SPONSOR: CardioComm Solutions (EKG: TSX-V) – The heartbeat of cardiovascular medicine and telemedicine. Patented systems enable medical professionals, patients, and other healthcare professionals, clinics, hospitals and call centres to access and manage patient information in a secure and reliable environment.

mHealth Project to Crowdsource Consumer Data for Coronavirus Research

  • UCSF researchers are deploying an mHealth app to gather information on daily health habits
  • They’re hoping to gain insight on how behaviors might affect the course of the virus or outcomes in those who are infected

By Eric Wicklund

March 31, 2020 – mHealth researchers are using smartphones to crowdsource Coronavirus research.

The University of California at San Francisco has launched COVID-19 Citizen Science (CCS), a project aimed at gathering insights from people around the world on the virus. Participants are being asked to download an mHealth app, complete a survey about their daily health habits, complete a weekly follow-up survey and pass it on to friends.

“We are asking each participant to share the link to recruit at least five others,” Gregory Marcus, MD, MAS, a professor at UCSF’s Department of Medicine and the project’s co-leader, said in a press release. “We want to demonstrate that the number of people signing up for this scientific study and contributing their data can increase exponentially, faster than the disease itself.”

Participants will also be able to provide continuous GPS data and information from mHealth wearables, such as Fitbit activity bands and smartwatches.

(For more coronavirus updates, visit our resource page, updated twice daily by Xtelligent Healthcare Media.)

The program is one of several aimed at using connected health platforms to study the pandemic. Just down the highway in San Diego, the Scripps Research Translational Institute has launched a project aimed at measuring the value of mHealth wearables in detecting emerging viral outbreaks.

Another project launched out of UCSF, meanwhile, is using mHealth wearables to monitor frontline care workers who’ve been exposed to the virus.

Marcos is no stranger to telehealth projects. In 2013 he helped to launch the Health eHeart Study, which used online and mHealth tools to collect and analyze heart health data. That, in turn, led to the launch of a study in 2018 that combined mHealth wearables with AI to determine whether a cardiac monitoring platform could help detect early signs of diabetes.

Marcos says CCS aims to identify behaviors, influences and factors that might affect the course of the virus and outcomes after infection, and he feels the study could be the largest-ever prospective epidemiological study of infectious diseases.

“Social distancing keeps many protected,” he said, “but joining together to contribute data will help us beat this thing.”

Source: https://mhealthintelligence.com/news/mhealth-project-to-crowdsource-consumer-data-for-coronavirus-research

‘Smart’ devices help reduce adverse outcomes of common heart condition #Mhealth – SPONSOR: CardioComm Solutions $EKG.ca – $ATE.ca $TLT.ca $OGI.ca $ACST.ca $IPA.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 4:02 PM on Tuesday, March 31st, 2020

SPONSOR: CardioComm Solutions (EKG: TSX-V) – The heartbeat of cardiovascular medicine and telemedicine. Patented systems enable medical professionals, patients, and other healthcare professionals, clinics, hospitals and call centres to access and manage patient information in a secure and reliable environment.

‘Smart’ devices help reduce adverse outcomes of common heart condition

  • mHealth devices, such as fitness trackers, smart watches and mobile phones, may enable earlier AF detection, and improved AF management through the use of photoplethysmography (PPG) technology
  • AF is the most common heart rhythm disturbance, affecting around one million people in the UK. People with AF are at increased risk of having a stroke and dying, as well as heart failure and dementia

by University of Liverpool

A new study, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, highlights the feasible use of mobile health (mHealth) devices to help with the screening and detection of a common heart condition.

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a heart rhythm condition that causes an irregular and sometimes, abnormally fast heart rate. In AF, the heart’s upper chambers (atria) contract randomly and sometimes so fast that the heart muscle cannot relax properly between contractions. This reduces the heart’s efficiency and performance—but also leads to a higher risk of blood clots.

AF is the most common heart rhythm disturbance, affecting around one million people in the UK. People with AF are at increased risk of having a stroke and dying, as well as heart failure and dementia. Currently, low detection due to lack of visible symptoms and non-adherence are major problems in current management approaches for patients with suspected AF.

Photoplethysmography technology

mHealth devices, such as fitness trackers, smart watches and mobile phones, may enable earlier AF detection, and improved AF management through the use of photoplethysmography (PPG) technology.

PPG is a simple and low-cost optical technique that can be used to detect blood volume changes in the microvascular bed of tissue. It is often used non-invasively to make measurements at the skin surface.

To help determine whether a mHealth technology-supported AF integrated management strategy would reduce AF-related adverse events, compared to usual care, an international team of researchers, led by Associate Professor Guo from Chinese PLA General Hospital in Beijing, and Professor Gregory Lip, Lead for the Liverpool Centre for Cardiovascular Science (LCCC)/Price-Evans Chair of Cardiovascular Medicine at University of Liverpool, conducted a randomised trial.

Central to the study was mobile health technologies developed by leading global technology companies, with a focus on using wearable smart devices such as those from Huawei, working in conjunction with a specially developed mobile app. These pieces of equipment and software can monitor a person’s vital signs with great detail and, most importantly for this study, 24 hours a day.

The specially designed mobile app not only charted the patient’s biometrics, it afforded clinicians the ability to offer integrated care throughout the duration of the trial. Doctors were able to periodically assess the patient’s updated statistics and contact them through the app to offer advice via the ABC care pathway. The ABC pathway, developed in part by the LCCS’ Professor Gregory Lip, is a set of guidance for patients and clinicians, which aims to promote a streamlined holistic approach to the management of AF, and ensure that the danger of complications is minimised.

The researchers enrolled a cluster of 3,324 AF patients aged over 18 years from 40 cities across China. The patients were randomized with 1678 receiving usual care and 1646 receiving integrated care based on a mobile AF Application (mAFA) incorporating the ABC Pathway: ‘A’ Avoid stroke; ‘B’ Better symptom management; ‘C’ Cardiovascular and other comorbidity risk reduction. All patients were followed up in outpatient clinics at 6 and 12 months.

Results

Upon completion of the study, the researchers were able to show that occurrences of stroke, systemic thromboembolism, death and rehospitalisation were significantly lower with those patients in the mHealth intervention group compared to those undergoing usual care (1.9% compared with 6%). Rehospitalisation rates were also notably reduced, with only 1.2% of patients in the intervention group needing to be readmitted to hospital, in comparison to 4.5% of patients in the control group.

In addition to these positive figures, subgroup analyses by gender, age, type of condition, risk score and comorbidities, demonstrated consistently lower risks for the composite outcome for patients receiving the mAFA intervention compared to usual care.

These results show an undeniable benefit for the adoption of an integrated approach to monitoring and treating cardiac conditions such as AF.

With smart technologies such as phones, watches and integrated smart home systems becoming increasingly accessible and affordable, the ability for clinicians and researchers to adopt this technology to passively and unobtrusively gather a seemingly unlimited amount of data and information on the global health population is offering boundless opportunity for assessing and treating all manner of diseases and conditions.

Integrated care approach

Associate Professor Guo, said: “Our study clearly highlights the need for an integrated care approach to holistic AF care, supported by mobile health technology, as it help to reduce the risks of rehospitalisation and clinical adverse events.”

Professor Lip, said: “Improved AF care requires early detection which enables the implementation of the priorities of AF management, which is as ‘easy as ABC’: Avoid stroke; Better symptom optimisation; Cardiovascular and risk factor management. Our clinical trial shows how the mAFA App and smart devices can improve detection of AF and the holistic management of AF patients, improving outcomes in this common heart rhythm disorder.”

Source: https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-03-smart-devices-adverse-outcomes-common.html

The Tech That Could Be Our Best Hope for Fighting #COVID19 —and Future Outbreaks – SPONSOR: CardioComm Solutions $EKG.ca – $ATE.ca $TLT.ca $OGI.ca $ACST.ca $IPA.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 5:09 PM on Monday, March 30th, 2020

SPONSOR: CardioComm Solutions (EKG: TSX-V) – The heartbeat of cardiovascular medicine and telemedicine. Patented systems enable medical professionals, patients, and other healthcare professionals, clinics, hospitals and call centres to access and manage patient information in a secure and reliable environment.

The Tech That Could Be Our Best Hope for Fighting COVID-19—and Future Outbreaks

  • “The connectivity we have today gives us ammunition to fight this pandemic in ways we never previously thought possible,” says Alain Labrique, director of the Johns Hopkins University Global -mHealth Initiative.

By Alice Park

Battling a pandemic as serious as COVID-19 requires drastic responses, and political leaders and public-health officials have turned to some of the most radical strategies available. What began with a lockdown of one city in China quickly expanded to the quarantine of an entire province, and now entire countries including Italy. While social isolation and curfews are among the most effective ways to break the chain of viral transmission, some health experts say it’s possible these draconian measures didn’t have to become a global phenomenon. “If health officials could have taken action earlier and contained the outbreak in Wuhan, where the first cases were reported, the global clampdown could have been at a much more local level,” says Richard Kuhn, a virologist and professor of science at -Purdue University.

The key to early response lies in looking beyond centuries-old strategies and incorporating methods that are familiar to nearly every industry from banking to retail to manufacturing, but that are still slow to be adopted in public health. Smartphone apps, data analytics and artificial intelligence all make finding and treating people with an infectious disease far more efficient than ever before.

“The connectivity we have today gives us ammunition to fight this pandemic in ways we never previously thought possible,” says Alain Labrique, director of the Johns Hopkins University Global -mHealth Initiative. And yet, to date, the global public–health response to COVID-19 has only scratched the surface of what these new containment tools offer. Building on them will be critical for ensuring that the next outbreak never gets the chance to explode from epidemic to global pandemic.

Consider how doctors currently detect new cases of COVID-19. Many people who develop the hallmark symptoms of the -disease—fever, cough and shortness of breath—-physically visit a primary-care doctor, a health care provider at an urgent-care center or an emergency room. But that’s the last thing people potentially infected with a highly contagious disease should do. Instead, health officials are urging them to connect remotely via an app to a doctor who can triage their symptoms while they’re still at home.

“The reality is that clinical brick-and-mortar medicine is rife with the possibility of virus exposure,” says Dr. Jonathan Wiesen, founder and chief medical officer of MediOrbis, a telehealth company. “The system we have in place is one in which everyone who is at risk is potentially transmitting infection. That is petrifying.” Instead, people could call a telemedicine center and describe their symptoms to a doctor who can then determine whether they need COVID-19 -testing—without exposing anyone else.

Hundreds Flout Louisiana COVID-19 Gatherings Ban

In Singapore, more than a million people have used a popular telehealth app called -MaNaDr, founded by family physician Dr. Siaw Tung Yeng, for virtual visits; 20% of the physicians in the island country offer some level of service via the app. In an effort to control escalating cases of coronavirus there, people with symptoms are getting prescreened by physicians on MaNaDr and advised to stay home if they don’t need intensive care. Patients then check in with their telehealth doctor every evening and report if their fever persists, if they have shortness of breath or if they are feeling worse. If they are getting sicker, the doctor orders an ambulance to take those people to the hospital. Siaw says the virtual monitoring makes people more comfortable about staying at home, where many cases can be treated, instead of flooding hospitals and doctors’ offices, straining limited resources and potentially making others sick. “This allows us to care across distance, monitor patients across distance and assess their progression across distance,” says Siaw. “There is no better time for remote care monitoring of our patients than now.”

Other at-home devices and services currently being used in the U.S. allow patients to measure dozens of health metrics like temperature, blood pressure and blood sugar several times a day, and the results are automatically stored on the cloud, from which doctors get alerts if the readings are abnormal.

Telemedicine also serves as a powerful communication tool for keeping hundreds of thousands of people in a specific region up to date with the latest advice about the risk in their communities and how best to protect themselves. That can go a long way toward reassuring people and preventing panic and runs on health centers and hospitals.

Beyond individual-level care, the data gathered by telemedicine services can be mined to predict the broader ebb and flow of an epidemic’s trajectory in a population. In the U.S., Kaiser Permanente’s tele-medicine call centers are now also serving as a bellwether for an anticipated surge in demand for health services. Dr. Stephen Parodi, national infectious–disease leader at Kaiser Permanente, was inspired by a Google project from a few years ago in which the company created an algorithm of users’ flu–related search terms to determine where clusters of cases were mounting. Parodi started tracking coronavirus–related calls from the health system’s 4.5 -million members in Northern California in February. “We went from 200 calls a day to 3,500 calls a day about symptoms of COVID-19, which was an early indicator of community–based transmission,” he says. “Our call volume was telling us several weeks before the country would have all of its testing online that we have got to plan for a surge in cases.”

Source: https://time.com/5805622/coronavirus-pandemic-technology/

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The Tech That Could Be Our Best Hope for Fighting COVID-19—and Future Outbreaks

By Alice Park

  • Battling a pandemic as serious as COVID-19 requires drastic responses, and political leaders and public-health officials have turned to some of the most radical strategies available.
  • The key to early response lies in looking beyond centuries-old strategies and incorporating methods that are familiar to nearly every industry from banking to retail to manufacturing, but that are still slow to be adopted in public health
  • Smartphone apps, data analytics and artificial intelligence all make finding and treating people with an infectious disease far more efficient than ever before

What began with a lockdown of one city in China quickly expanded to the quarantine of an entire province, and now entire countries including Italy. While social isolation and curfews are among the most effective ways to break the chain of viral transmission, some health experts say it’s possible these draconian measures didn’t have to become a global phenomenon. “If health officials could have taken action earlier and contained the outbreak in Wuhan, where the first cases were reported, the global clampdown could have been at a much more local level,” says Richard Kuhn, a virologist and professor of science at -Purdue University.

The key to early response lies in looking beyond centuries-old strategies and incorporating methods that are familiar to nearly every industry from banking to retail to manufacturing, but that are still slow to be adopted in public health. Smartphone apps, data analytics and artificial intelligence all make finding and treating people with an infectious disease far more efficient than ever before.

“The connectivity we have today gives us ammunition to fight this pandemic in ways we never previously thought possible,” says Alain Labrique, director of the Johns Hopkins University Global -mHealth Initiative. And yet, to date, the global public–health response to COVID-19 has only scratched the surface of what these new containment tools offer. Building on them will be critical for ensuring that the next outbreak never gets the chance to explode from epidemic to global pandemic.

Consider how doctors currently detect new cases of COVID-19. Many people who develop the hallmark symptoms of the -disease—fever, cough and shortness of breath—-physically visit a primary-care doctor, a health care provider at an urgent-care center or an emergency room. But that’s the last thing people potentially infected with a highly contagious disease should do. Instead, health officials are urging them to connect remotely via an app to a doctor who can triage their symptoms while they’re still at home.

“The reality is that clinical brick-and-mortar medicine is rife with the possibility of virus exposure,” says Dr. Jonathan Wiesen, founder and chief medical officer of MediOrbis, a telehealth company. “The system we have in place is one in which everyone who is at risk is potentially transmitting infection. That is petrifying.” Instead, people could call a telemedicine center and describe their symptoms to a doctor who can then determine whether they need COVID-19 -testing—without exposing anyone else.

In Singapore, more than a million people have used a popular telehealth app called -MaNaDr, founded by family physician Dr. Siaw Tung Yeng, for virtual visits; 20% of the physicians in the island country offer some level of service via the app. In an effort to control escalating cases of coronavirus there, people with symptoms are getting prescreened by physicians on MaNaDr and advised to stay home if they don’t need intensive care. Patients then check in with their telehealth doctor every evening and report if their fever persists, if they have shortness of breath or if they are feeling worse. If they are getting sicker, the doctor orders an ambulance to take those people to the hospital. Siaw says the virtual monitoring makes people more comfortable about staying at home, where many cases can be treated, instead of flooding hospitals and doctors’ offices, straining limited resources and potentially making others sick. “This allows us to care across distance, monitor patients across distance and assess their progression across distance,” says Siaw. “There is no better time for remote care monitoring of our patients than now.”

Other at-home devices and services currently being used in the U.S. allow patients to measure dozens of health metrics like temperature, blood pressure and blood sugar several times a day, and the results are automatically stored on the cloud, from which doctors get alerts if the readings are abnormal.

Telemedicine also serves as a powerful communication tool for keeping hundreds of thousands of people in a specific region up to date with the latest advice about the risk in their communities and how best to protect themselves. That can go a long way toward reassuring people and preventing panic and runs on health centers and hospitals.

Beyond individual-level care, the data gathered by telemedicine services can be mined to predict the broader ebb and flow of an epidemic’s trajectory in a population. In the U.S., Kaiser Permanente’s tele-medicine call centers are now also serving as a bellwether for an anticipated surge in demand for health services. Dr. Stephen Parodi, national infectious–disease leader at Kaiser Permanente, was inspired by a Google project from a few years ago in which the company created an algorithm of users’ flu–related search terms to determine where clusters of cases were mounting. Parodi started tracking coronavirus–related calls from the health system’s 4.5 -million members in Northern California in February. “We went from 200 calls a day to 3,500 calls a day about symptoms of COVID-19, which was an early indicator of community–based transmission,” he says. “Our call volume was telling us several weeks before the country would have all of its testing online that we have got to plan for a surge in cases.”

On the basis of the swell in calls nationwide, the hospital system is considering suspending elective surgeries based on local circumstances, in part to ensure that ventilators and other critical equipment would be available for an anticipated influx of COVID-19 patients with severe symptoms. Kaiser doctors also postponed appointments for routine mammograms and other cancer–screening tests and cut back on in-person appointments by turning most noncritical visits into virtual visits.

The COVID-19 pandemic may be the trial by fire that telemedicine finally needs to prove its worth, especially in the U.S. Despite the fact that apps and technology for virtual health visits have existed for several decades, uptake in the country has been slow. Medicare only recently began reimbursing for telemedicine visits at rates comparable to in-person visits, and states have just begun to relax licensing regulations that prevent doctors in one state from -remotely treating patients in another state. “This -pandemic is almost like us crossing the Rubicon,” says Wiesen of MediOrbis. “It’s a clarion call for America and for the world on how important telemedicine is.” Parodi agrees. “I think this pandemic will bring in a fundamental change in the way we practice medicine and in the way the health care system functions in the U.S.,” he says. “We’re going to come out of this and -realize a lot of health care visits don’t have to be in person.”

Other tech innovations that haven’t fully made their way to the public-health sector could also play a critical role in controlling this -pandemic—and future outbreaks. Taking a closer look at health-related data, such as electronic health records or sales of over-the-counter medications, can provide valuable clues about how an infectious disease like COVID-19 is moving through a population. Retail drugstores track inventory and sales of nonprescription fever reducers, for example, and any trends in those data might serve as an early, albeit crude, harbinger of growing spread of disease in a community. And given the proliferation of health–tracking apps on smartphones, analyzing data trends like a rise in average body temperature in a given geographical area could provide clues to emerging clusters of cases.

Geotracking on phones, while controversial because of privacy issues, can also streamline the tedious task of contact tracing, in which scientists try to manually trace infected patients’ whereabouts to find as many people with whom they had direct contact and who could have been infected. In South Korea, this strategy helped identify many of the contacts of members of a Seoul church that formed the first major cluster of infections in the country. In countries with a less robust health care infrastructure, smartphones can be critical for gathering information about emerging infections on the ground. In Bangladesh, says Labrique, programs created to canvass for noncommunicable diseases like hyper-tension and diabetes are now being modified to include questions about COVID-19 symptoms. These types of real-time data can rapidly provide a snapshot of where and how fast the disease might be spreading, to distribute health care workers and -equipment where they’re needed most.

It’s all about catching these cases as early as possible, to minimize the peak of a pandemic so the health system doesn’t get overwhelmed. But it’s not just about seeing the trends. Flattening the surge of an infectious disease also requires action, and that’s where the advice gets -muddier—but also where Big Data and artificial intelligence (AI) can provide clarity.

By deeply analyzing the care that every COVID-19 patient receives, for example, AI can tease out the best treatment strategies. Jvion, a health care analytics company, is using AI to study 30 million patients in its data universe to identify people and communities at highest risk of COVID-19 on the basis of more than 5,000 variables that include not just medical history but also lifestyle and socioeconomic factors such as access to stable housing and transportation. Working with clients that include large hospital systems as well as small remote health centers, Jvion’s platform creates lists of people who should be contacted pro-actively to warn them about their vulnerability so health providers can create a care plan for them.

In the case of COVID-19, that might include social distancing and avoiding large public gatherings. To help public-health departments better prepare communities for this and future outbreaks, the company has communicated with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to share what it has learned.

Privacy issues, however, nest in every single byte of data about a person’s health. So the power of AI methods in controlling outbreaks depends on how effectively data can be anonymized. Only when people are assured of privacy can algorithms help to navigate the next big hurdle: predicting surges in cases that strain health care personnel and availability of supplies like ventilators, masks and gowns.

If COVID-19 teaches public-health officials one thing, it’s that there are now tools available to help contain an infectious disease before radical measures like quarantines and curfews are needed. “What we were doing 10 years ago and what we are doing now is vastly different,” says Wiesen. “There is a tremendous opportunity here, and hopefully by [the next pandemic], the use of technology and data analytics is going to be light-years ahead of where it is today.”

Source: https://time.com/5805622/coronavirus-pandemic-technology/