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Nielsen count: Measuring value of #Esports tournaments $GMBL.us

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 11:04 AM on Thursday, August 17th, 2017
  • Nielsen has launched a competitive gaming branch that will measure the value of esports tournaments, events and streams
  • Also release global fan insights throughout the year, with a new research offering spanning the United State, England, Germany, France, Japan, South Korea, and China in 2017

Nielsen developed Esport24, a syndicated sponsorship tracking service for esports tournaments. The service measures brand exposure in esports tournaments representing a variety of titles, event formats and geographic locations based on the same methodology that allows traditional sports rights holders and brands to quantify value and benchmark performance.

Nielsen has created an esports advisory board of industry stakeholders who will provide insight to help shape the future of esports audience measurement and valuation. ESL, ESPN, Facebook, FIFA, Major League Gaming/Activision Blizzard, NBA 2K League, The Next Level, Sony PlayStation, Turner, Twitch, Twitter, Unilever, and Google YouTube are all part of the board.

“The global, digital and young nature of esports fan base audience represents advertising’s most highly sought after segment, yet consistent and high quality data has been a challenge to measure and define,” said Craig Levine, CEO of North America, ESL. “As ESL has been pioneering esports for the past 15 years, we have witnessed the incredible growth and enthusiasm of our audience.

“We’re excited to partner with Nielsen and other industry leaders to guide the framework to measure esports sponsorships, shape the industry, and help further accelerate the esports industry overall.”

Nielsen is one of top market research firms that measure the TV and media business.

Stephen Master and Nicole Pike will-lead the global Nielsen Esports business.

Source: http://nationalpost.com/pmn/entertainment-pmn/nielsen-count-measuring-value-of-esports-tournaments/wcm/7ab5e381-753b-447e-946f-c12fbb83b3b6

College #Esports Teams Aim To Get Varsity Sport Status $GMBL.us

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 6:00 PM on Wednesday, August 16th, 2017
  • New leagues. Tespa’s events now include competitions in Overwatch, Hearthstone, Heroes of the Storm, StarCraft II, World of Warcraft and Rocket League.
  • Open membership. Previously, students had to compete in a Tespa league or go to a university with a Tespa chapter. This year, students at any North American university may compete, a move Tespa hopes will spur chapter creation.
  • Six broadcasts a week, and on- and off-seasons for each game (Overwatch in the fall, for example, and Hearthstone or Heroes in the spring.)

I write about PC gaming, virtual reality games and Blizzard eSports.Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own.

Heroes of the Dorm Blizzard Entertainment

Fans cheer on University of California, Irvine, at the 2017 Heroes of the Dorm competition.

Two announcements today will help esports take one more step toward traditional competitive sports status at universities around the country.

Tespa, organizers of the “Heroes of the Dorm” competitions broadcast on ESPN networks, announced a slew of new changes for its events designed to direct more scholarship money towards student gamers and encourage participation from more university campuses. Among the announcements:

  • New leagues. Tespa’s events now include competitions in Overwatch, Hearthstone, Heroes of the Storm, StarCraft II, World of Warcraft and Rocket League.
  • Open membership. Previously, students had to compete in a Tespa league or go to a university with a Tespa chapter. This year, students at any North American university may compete, a move Tespa hopes will spur chapter creation.
  • Six broadcasts a week, and on- and off-seasons for each game (Overwatch in the fall, for example, and Hearthstone or Heroes in the spring.)
  • More money. Tespa tournaments will hand out more than $800,000 in scholarships and $200,000 in other prizes. Heroes of the Dorm winners already received full scholarships for the remainder of their college careers.
  • In-game rewards. Tespa competitors in Blizzard Entertainment titles–all the games on the list but Rocket League–will earn in-game goodies such as Hearthstone card packs or Heroes of the Storm loot chests by progressing in standing with Tespa.

In a simultaneous statement, Georgia State University announced that it will join two collegiate gaming leagues, the National Association of Collegiate eSports (NACE, which has 33 programs) and the new Georgia Esports League (GEL), which launches next month. GSU will become the latest university to award scholarships, practice facilities and other varsity-team perks to its gamers, joining such campuses as University of California, Irvine; Western Kentucky University and the University of Utah.

 

Blizzard Entertainment

Adam Rosen

“One of the things we’re focused on is to help grow collegiate teams in the esports space,” said Adam Rosen. He and twin brother Tyler founded Tespa when they were students at  the University of Texas at Austin. “We want competing for universities to be an aspirational thing. A lot of times universities are a little bit scared of it. It’s a risky endeavor. We’re attempting to provide assurances that our leagues will be around for multiple years, and formats will be consistent. We strongly feel it’s going to be the best year ever for esports.”

Tespa’s first year in 2010 consisted of an informal group of approximately 30 gamers from UT who showed up to compete in StarCraft II. Today it encompasses more than 65,000 members, with 220 chapters at more than 1200 universities.

“If we were to look at Tespa’s size now and compare it to a Greek organization, we’d be in the top 10 in the world for number of chapters,” Tyler Rosen said. “When Adam and I founded Tespa, we had this dream of elevating gaming to the same levels as traditional sports on campus. Last year, we had more tournaments than ever before.”

Georgia State University statements say the university sees esports as a way for its students to not only compete, but build skills and provide opportunities to learn concepts in broadcasting, production, coaching, student management, game development and marketing.

Blizzard Entertainment

The University of Texas at Arlington won Heroes of the Dorm 2017.

“The skills developed by eSports-interested students are the very skills most needed for success in the 21st century economy, including collaborative soft skills and computer coding,” said David Cheshier, director of the Georgia State Creative Media Industries Institute, in a written statement. “We see this initiative as building essential links to emerging creative careers in animation, 3D and immersive world creation, and other media industries.”

More than 90 million viewers watched esports finals in 2016, the university said.

“Esports are both the most rapidly growing field of sports and also one of the best ways to get students interested in technology,” said Andrew Greenberg, president of the Georgia Game Developers Association. GGDA sponsors the new Georgia league.

“Georgia State has become one of the first schools to recognize the link between eSports and academic achievement. We are delighted both with its role as one of the Georgia Esports League’s inaugural members and the opportunities it is providing its students.”

 Blizzard

Tyler Rosen

Tyler Rosen said when the company first got started–even when its Heroes of the Dorm tournament was first broadcast on ESPN–colleges were hesitant.

“At first, a lot of the universities ignored their teams,” he said. “But what we saw hosting that tournament year over year was that universities were supporting their teams: celebrating on social media, giving them facilities they needed. Arizona State University [winners the 2016 Heroes of the Dorm competition] brought them back to campus, paraded them at a baseball game, and gave them full housing scholarships. That’s a really great trend that we’ve seen growing.”

Registration for upcoming Tespa tournaments begins today.

 

I’ve covered gaming for more than two decades, and I cover PC games, VR games and Blizzard eSports for Forbes. Sign up for email alerts when my stories run. Follow me @gbitses.

 

Source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/hnewman/2017/08/16/college-esports-teams-aim-to-get-gaming-varsity-sport-status/#3a5ce9c51191

 

How Esports Will Win The Future And So Will Activision $GMBL.us

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 9:49 AM on Tuesday, August 15th, 2017
  • When an investing firm which boasts about how few investments it makes, says it’s excited about a company, then it’s time to listen
  • Rossbach says eSports are the future and will likely leave the pro-sports in the dust, at least for investors

,

When an investing firm which boasts about how few investments it makes, says it’s excited about a company, then it’s time to listen.

The operation in question is London-based J. Stern & Co., which describes itself as a private investment office — somewhere between a family office and an investment manager.

“We are very long term investors and since inception of the core portfolio in October 2012, we have traded only two or three companies a year,” says Chris Rossbach, chief investment officer at J. Stern.

He and his team have recently been turned on by a new trend that could reap big rewards. Specifically, Rossbach says eSports are the future and will likely leave the pro-sports in the dust, at least for investors. The stock in question is Activision Blizzard.

Visitors play the video game ‘Overwatch.’ Credit: LIONEL BONAVENTURE/AFP/Getty Images

If you don’t already know, eSports are competitive video game sports that people not only like to play but also like to watch when others play.

“The management and CEO of ActivisionBlizzard almost created the industry,” says Rossbach.

If watching others play video games sounds strange to you, don’t worry, there are plenty for whom this is normal. How many? A July-dated report from J. Stern sums it up:

“Newzoo, an expert in video games data, predicts that the global eSports audience will increase to a staggering 385 million people in 2017 and estimates that revenues from eSports will grow from $130 million in 2012 to $696 million this year.”

More than that, the “audience is highly engaged,” says Rossbach.

So eSports has a fast growing audience that is really ‘in’ to gaming as an activity to participate in or as a spectator. The same could be said about other pro sports. Yes, and that is also where the comparison is instructive.

The rise of Esports sees wave of Gaming Cafe’s open $GMBL.us

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 11:46 AM on Friday, August 11th, 2017
  • Each month, over 100 million viewers tune to watch video game play and that number is expected to near 145 million by the end of the year
  • eSports tournaments have exploded in the past 14 years and what started as small events between amateur players has grew to nearly 2,000 tournaments boasting the world’s top professional players

eSports is undoubtedly a million-dollar industry with millions of fans worldwide. America, with its NBA, NFL, NHL and MLS is even witnessing eSports coming the fastest-growing and most-viewed sport. Each month, over 100 million viewers tune to watch video game play and that number is expected to near 145 million by the end of the year. eSports tournaments have exploded in the past 14 years and what started as small events between amateur players has grew to nearly 2,000 tournaments boasting the world’s top professional players.

The likes of Vodafone are now even getting in the action and took advantage of the thriving gaming market in Spain by launching its own eSports channel. The network provider launched a dedicated Twitter page for eSports Vodafone and has also announced a collaboration with G2 eSports, a world premier eSports club, to support a League of Legends team in Spain.

Many high-street bookmakers are capitalising on the buzz and host a platform for betting on eSports, offering great deposit bonuses and more. Betting on eSports may sound strange but live-betting is a form of wagering that has taken off in recent years, in particularly on live casino platforms like CasinoCruise.

Elsewhere in Europe, eSports is also big business in the UK with a number of eSports cafes propping up. In London, popular eSsports café Meltdown allows you to play games including Hearthstone, Starcraft 2, DOTA 2 and League of Legends to name a few. The café offers customers their PCs and consoles for free, whether its to play or watch live streams. All users need to pay for is any food or drink they consume, entry is free and the majority of tournaments are free to enter. The café is overwhelmingly popular and has been since its opening in 2013.

credit: Micko1986

Across the capital is Swan Wharf, a Victorian warehouse amassed with design agencies, metalworking workshops and other assorted businesses. It does not look like the place to find a promising new hub for gamers, but that’s exactly what you’ll find spanning two floors of this building. Named EXP, it is described by its founder as “the largest dedicated games and play-space in London, embracing video games, table top games, films, TV, books and comic hobbyists”. On the top floor, you’ll come across 32 gaming PCS – all great for watching and playing eSports, 20 consoles ranging from Xbox One to PlayStation 4 from the modem era and retro favourites such as Nintendo 64.

The popularity of eSports tournaments is booming. Players are simply competing against one another on the latest computer games and the industry is booming.

eSports tells us that the likely winners in the online gambling market will be not only the obvious casino players, but also others that embrace the full spectrum of entertainment and social media around it.

The total of number of hours spent watching eSports events last year exceeded six billion worldwide, up 19% from 2015. Not only has the popularity of eSports grown exponentially but so has its profitability, thus gambling websites are leveraging the trend’s success.

Read more: The rise of eSports sees wave of Gaming Cafe’s open – TNT Magazine

BULLETIN: Casinos embrace esports even as they work to understand it $GMBL.us

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 10:44 AM on Tuesday, August 8th, 2017

  • Competitive video game tournaments, known as esports, are a growing industry around the world
  • fast-paced action, vivid graphics and often violent on-screen action is catnip to millennials, the audience casinos are targeting as their core slot players grow old and die

In this March 31, 2017 photo, video game players compete against one another in an esports tournament at Caesars casino in Atlantic City, N.J. Casinos are slowly embracing esports as a way to help their bottom line, but so far, the money is coming from renting hotel rooms to the young players and selling them food and drinks, not from turning them into gamblers. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. — Casinos are slowly embracing competitive video game tournaments as a way to help their bottom lines, but the money is coming from renting hotel rooms to the young players and selling them food and drinks, not from turning them into gamblers.

Like most other ways gambling halls have tried to attract millennials and their disposable income, it hasn’t been easy. Atlantic City was first city in the nation to adopt skill-based slot machines to woo millennials but bailed on them after a few months when the response was underwhelming.

Competitive video game tournaments, known as esports, are a growing industry around the world. The fast-paced action, vivid graphics and often violent on-screen action is catnip to millennials, the audience casinos are targeting as their core slot players grow old and die.

But it’s been difficult to move them from the video console to the craps table.

“Everybody’s still trying to figure out, how do you make this appealing for the consumer and make sense for the business? How do we all profit from this?” said Kevin Ortzman, Atlantic City regional president for Caesars Entertainment, which owns three casinos in the city.

The company in March hosted an esports tournament at Caesars that drew about 900 competitors and spectators.

The bottom line result was encouraging, if not dynamite.

“We certainly experienced a spike in our hospitality offerings — the hotel, food and beverage side of things,” Ortzman said. “We didn’t see as much on the gambling side, which we weren’t terribly surprised by.”

But he said coming up with ways to attract millennials is a necessity for the casino industry as a whole, adding that esports players could be cultivated to embrace casinos for video game competitions the way their parents and grandparents went there to play slot machines.

Gambling requires discretionary income and free time, things that people starting their careers or families may not have in abundance, said David Schwartz, director of the Center for Gaming Research at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas.

“The big question is whether people who are 40 or 20 now will begin to play casino games as they get older,” Schwartz said. “This isn’t a given.”

Schwartz agreed the real money for casinos in esports tournaments comes from ancillary spending on food, drinks and hotel rooms.

The Caesars video tournament offered $200,000 in prize money, including a $70,000 top prize, that lured players like Jose Mavo, of Charlotte, North Carolina, who has been playing competitively for a decade and has become a casino customer as a result of being in tournaments hosted by gambling halls.

“We had a tournament in Vegas, and that was the first time I went to a casino, so ever since then, I’ve been gambling quite a bit,” he said, listing blackjack and roulette as favourites.

Alec Collins, of Piedmont, South Carolina, who goes by the competitive name Shock, is only 18, so he’s three years away from gambling legally. But it’s something he’d like to try then.

“I love Atlantic City so in a few years I would definitely come back and experience the casino a little bit,” he said.

Until then, he added, referring to the video game competition, “We’re just here to shoot our guns.”

Wall Street sees growth potential in esports. Deloitte Global pegged the worldwide esports market last year at $500 million, up from $400 million in 2015, and estimated the industry has a global in-person or online audience of nearly 150 million people a year.

Newzoo, a company following the esports market, predicted in a report that esports will generate nearly $700 million this year, including media rights, ticket and merchandise sales, brand partnerships and game maker investments. The company projects that figure will surpass the $1.5 billion mark by 2019.

One of the biggest supporters of esports among casino owners is Seth Schorr, CEO of the Downtown Grand in Las Vegas, whose casino regularly hosts video game tournaments that, he said, “make a little bit of money.” But Schorr said the tournaments offer other revenue opportunities, including suites for groups and meal packages.

“Is it the silver bullet? Of course not,” he said. “Is it one tactic in an overall strategy? Of course it is.”

Source: http://business.financialpost.com/business-pmn/casinos-embrace-esports-even-as-they-work-to-understand-it/wcm/558dffd2-75e5-49e2-932f-58b8e0e8ab66

Tencent Details $15B Esports Investment Plan Over The Next 5 Years $GMBL.us

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 8:23 AM on Friday, August 4th, 2017

tencent esports

  • World’s largest mobile gaming developer and the parent owner of Riot Games, has revealed a five-year outline for its esports ventures
  • Planning to create a 100 billion yuan ($14.6 billion) industry within China,
  • Includes new leagues, tournaments, associations and its previously announced esports-themed industrial parks

Tencent, the world’s largest mobile gaming developer and the parent owner of Riot Games, has revealed a five-year outline for its esports ventures. The investment holding company announced at a press conference last Friday that it would create a 100 billion yuan ($14.6 billion) industry within China, complete with new leagues, tournaments, associations and its previously announced esports-themed industrial parks.

Tencent sits within the world’s top ten companies measured by market capitalisation.

The announcement was made by Tencent E-sports, its competitive gaming subsidiary established in December 2016. At the same conference, Ding Dong, Director of the information center of the State General Administration of Sports, confirmed that Chinese sport authorities would be working closely with Tencent over the next five years to establish unified standards for esports in the country.

Tencent, as well as fellow esports competitor Alibaba, sits within the world’s top ten companies measured by market capitalisation. Alongside its esports success with League of Legends, Tencent acquired 84% of Finnish mobile developer Supercell in 2016 for $8.6 billion, and recently launched a $1 million prize pool league platform for its tower defense/MOBA hybrid title Clash Royale.

In China, Tencent’s LoL “inspired” MOBA Honor of Kings has consistently been a chart topper for mobile devices, was largely responsible for an 87 per cent spike for the company’s mobile game revenue in Q3 of 2016, and its Pro League last year was watched by over 70 million people. The title was soft-launched in Europe earlier this year, under the alternative title Strike of Kings.

According to the research firm IDC, China’s total revenue from the esports industry has grown 52% year-on-year to $7.3 billion, and 34 percent of this was generated by mobile gaming. Tencent’s major investment in their home esport-turf could be an attempt to finally claim the last area where they aren’t #1: prize-winnings. According to Unibet, Chinese esport tournament winnings last year eclipsed $19.3 million, primarily on the back of Valve’s Dota 2.

Source: https://esportsobserver.com/tencent-china-investment-plan/

Esports Entertainment Group Announces Two Key Employee hires, Preparing For Launch Of Esports Betting Platform $GMBL.us

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 11:58 AM on Thursday, August 3rd, 2017

Esports large

  • Announced hiring of two additional key personnel
  • Preparing for the imminent launch of Esports betting operations

ST. MARY’S, ANTIGUA–(Aug 3, 2017) – Esports Entertainment Group Inc. (OTCQB: GMBL) (or the “Company”), a licensed online gambling company with a specific focus on esports wagering, is pleased to announce the hiring of two additional key personnel in preparation for the imminent launch of our esports betting operations. The new personnel adds to the digital marketing team and full time staff announced in July.

Stephen Cotugno – Vice President, Corporate finance

Stephen has extensive corporate finance and investment banking experience over the last 20 years. Most recently, he served as Vice President, Investment Banking at Axiom Capital Management, a New York based investment bank, where he specialized in utilizing new SEC regulations under The Jobs Act to assist companies in raising capital.

As Vice President, Corporate, Stephen will be primarily focused on leading our growth funding over the next couple of years, as well as, IR communications with institutions and funds.

Brian Cordry – Head of Esports 

Brian brings extensive esports experience to the Company on multiple fronts, including spending the past five years as an esports multi-team owner with Winterfox, as well as, a manager with Velocity eSports and Evil Geniuses.

As Head of Esports, Brian will ensure that our online product doesn’t repeat mistakes that previous gambling websites have made, keeping everything transparent for the esports community – and creating a safe, competitive platform where esports fans can show off their knowledge of their favorite teams and players while betting against each other.

Grant Johnson, CEO of Esports Entertainment Group stated, “With the Company on the verge of launching the safest, most secure and transparent esports betting platform in the world, the addition of both Stephen and Brian to our growing team of esports and corporate professionals is timely. Esports Entertainment Group intends on becoming a meaningful long-term player and leader within the hyper growth esports industry by aggressively growing our operations over the next several years. These gentlemen bring significant skill sets and credibility to enable that growth.”

This press release is available on our Online Investor Relations Community for shareholders and potential shareholders to ask questions, receive answers and collaborate with management in a fully moderated forum at https://agoracom.com/ir/EsportsEntertainmentGroup

About

Esports Entertainment Group Inc. is a licensed online gambling company specifically focused on eSports wagering. Esports Entertainment intends to offer wagering on esports events in a fully licensed, regulated and secured platform to the global esports audience, excluding the United States. In addition, Esports Entertainment intends to offer users from around the world the ability to participate in multi-player video games tournaments online for cash prizes. Esports Entertainment is led by a team of industry and technical experts from the online gambling and video game industries, esports, marketing, legal and financial professionals. The Company maintains offices in St. Mary’s, Antigua and Barbuda. Esports Entertainment common stock is listed on the OTCQB under the symbol GMBL. For more information please visit www.esportsentertainmentgroup.com

About Esports Entertainment Group Licensing, Compliance And Regulatory Process

1. Esports Entertainment Group (Antigua Subsidiary) is licensed by the Kahnawake Gaming Commission.

2. Esports Entertainment Group has entered into a Betting Gaming Platform Software Agreement with Swiss Interactive Software GmbH to provide wagering platform software.

3. Esports Entertainment Group has agreed to integrate the award-winning affiliate management platform of Income Access to manage the Company’s forthcoming affiliate program.

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
The information contained herein includes forward-looking statements. These statements relate to future events or to our future financial performance, and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our actual results, levels of activity, performance, or achievements to be materially different from any future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. You should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements since they involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which are, in some cases, beyond our control and which could, and likely will, materially affect actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements. Any forward-looking statement reflects our current views with respect to future events and is subject to these and other risks, uncertainties and assumptions relating to our operations, results of operations, growth strategy and liquidity. We assume no obligation to publicly update or revise these forward-looking statements for any reason, or to update the reasons actual results could differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements, even if new information becomes available in the future. The safe harbor for forward-looking statements contained in the Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 protects companies from liability for their forward-looking statements if they comply with the requirements of the Act.

Contact:

Corporate Matters
Grant Johnson
Chief Executive Officer
grant@vgambling.net

All Investor Relations Inquiries
AGORACOM
ESPO@agoracom.com
https://agoracom.com/ir/eSportsEntertainmentGroup

What The Emergence Of The #Esports Industry Means For Brands $GMBL.us

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 11:24 AM on Tuesday, August 1st, 2017
  • According to ESPN (yes, even ESPN is in the mix now), the industry boasts events with viewerships that rival the Super Bowl, making it one of the fastest growing phenomena out there.  

Brands are just now beginning to understand the influence eSports has on marketing.

The world of eSports is suddenly all grown up. According to ESPN (yes, even ESPN is in the mix now), the industry boasts events with viewerships that rival the Super Bowl, making it one of the fastest growing phenomena out there. With approximately 148 million eSport fans around the globe, this has become a massive spectator sport, with cash prizes in the millions. And brands have been cashing in gleefully.

The magic of eSports isn’t just in the gameplay itself, but in the personalities and culture around it. This has led to sponsorships of teams, players and competitions, as well as giveaways, which are creating massive global visibility for brands.

Additionally, the market has a much more inclusive fandom than ordinary sports. It’s predicted that the market will reach over $1.5 billion by 2020, so it might be time for your brand to start thinking about how it can be part of the action.

I recently sat down with SoaR Games to chat about where the industry is at, why it has exploded in popularity and how your brand can take part. This team provided incredible insights. If you’re looking to get in the game, I suggest you take notes.

The New Frontier In Entertainment

“We are in a new era,” explains Michael “Makz” Maknojia, owner of SoaR Gaming. “Once you’re in the industry, you become part of a whole new universe. ESports has changed the world as we know it. No longer can people say video games will get you nowhere, because a professional eSports player could earn a salary higher than a doctor’s. It’s one of the fastest growing industries, growing at a rate almost faster than show business.”

While the internet has hurt a lot of traditional routes in media, gaming has arisen as a completely new area to capitalize on. However, in common with a lot of innovations in the tech world, some don’t understand how to target gamers.

Authenticity In A Digital World

Many advertisers worry about how to reach gamers effectively. It can be an incredibly difficult task given that these folks can be unforgiving, and even nasty, if an outsider tries to infiltrate their culture solely for monetary gain. That’s why an authentic approach is imperative. Instead of trying to sell to the gamer, learn to sell with them.

Jason “General” Wilhelm, the managing director of SoaR Gaming, says, “Many of the people involved in this industry also have a lot of passion for gaming and eSports as a whole. They want to see this scene grow and succeed because they see the potential it has.

ESports is very different from other entertainment industries, and I think it needs to be approached with a different mindset. The biggest thing that I see changing in the future is the number of big companies and people getting involved in the scene. This will only increase the value of the industry as a whole.”

Wilhelm hits the nail on the head with the word passion. These people are fully invested in this lifestyle, and if you want to reach them, you have to be passionate about gaming as well.

Take Yourself Out Of The Game

As Clayton “Nudah” Huddleston, general manager at SoaR Gaming, notes: “Today, there are so many creators out there producing content, it’s almost like having a million people to enjoy the experience with on a daily basis.

As much as the average viewer cares about what game is being played, were it not for a creator’s personality and how they portray themselves on social media, they wouldn’t feel that genuine connection with them.”

The goal when reaching out to the eSports community should be to respect who these players are and what they represent to their fans. People want to feel as though they’re a part of this intimate experience. And if your brand wants to be involved, you’d better find someone to pick up sticks with.

You should aspire to find a player or team that matches your brand’s personality. Figure out what it is they’re doing that their fans like and help push them to the next level. The less you try to insert yourself as the frontrunner in this show, the better.

Remember, this is about authenticity, and so you have to let them take the lead on what they know, with your company as a supporting actor. If you get things right, you just might find yourself riding the wave of eSports into the stratosphere.

Deep Patel is a serial entrepreneur, marketer and the author of A Paperboy’s Fable: The 11 Principles of Success.

Source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/deeppatel/2017/08/01/what-the-emergence-of-the-esports-industry-means-for-brands/#3438b68311b5

PODCAST: Team Dignitas Captain And CEO Talk Winning Esports Strategies $GMBL.us

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 12:16 PM on Thursday, July 27th, 2017

Listen to the full episode here:

Team Dignitas was formed in September 2003, after the merger of two excellent Battlefield 1942 teams. The new ‘Dignitas’ Battlefield team went on to be very successful and after attending CeBIT (2004) it held discussions with ABIT and within a few months had secured its first sponsor.

In 2016, as more traditional sports team owners were discovering the potential of Esports, the NBA’s Philadelphia 76ers acquired Team Digitas, becoming the first North American franchise to own an Esports team.

Team members from teams ‘Dignitas’ (L) and ‘Evil Genius’ (R) are seen on the screen during the live taping of the League of Legends North American Championship Series Spring round robin competition, at the MBS Media Campus in Manhattan Beach, California February 22, 2014. (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)

In this SportsMoney podcast I chatted with Team Dignitas CEO Jonathan Kemp and team captain for Team Dignitas CS:GO Female team, Emmalee Garrido, separately. Kemp discusses the business strategy of Team Digitas; Garrido how she became involved in Esports, her training and what life is like as a professonal gamer.

Source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/mikeozanian/2017/07/27/podcast-team-dignitas-captain-and-ceo-talk-winning-esports-strategies/#1c47054321a4

The traditional sports world is taking eSports into the mainstream $GMBL.us

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 11:47 AM on Friday, July 21st, 2017

Esports large

  • US channels like Disney XD, ESPN, NBC and TBS are all trying to put eSports on the same level as traditional sports, with the end goal being to reach new, younger audiences
  • Recent interest from giant broadcasters comes as the world of eSports continues to reach new heights

Five years ago, you couldn’t have imagined video game competitions being broadcasted on the same channel as traditional sports. TV networks have been historically obsessed with pastimes such as baseball, basketball, football and soccer, but times are changing. Thanks to the massive popularity of eSports, driven in large part by the internet-streaming generation, the entertainment landscape has transformed drastically over the past couple of years. Nowadays, US channels like Disney XD, ESPN, NBC and TBS are all trying to put eSports on the same level as traditional sports, with the end goal being to reach new, younger audiences. Want to watch a EA’s FIFA or Rocket League tournament on ESPN? Well, you can do just that.

The recent interest from giant broadcasters comes as the world of eSports continues to reach new heights. Pro gaming tournaments are selling out arenas worldwide and, every time a competition is streamed on Twitch, there are millions of viewers tuning in. With business this good, why wouldn’t anyone want a piece of the pie? NBCUniversal, which owns NBC and NBC Sports, is the perfect example. The company announced it would be launching its own two-on-two eSports tournament this summer, featuring one of the most popular games right now: Rocket League. It’ll air on the NBC Sports network, right alongside the English Premier League.

“We’re in the sports business,” says Rob Simmelkjaer, senior vice president for NBC’s Sports Ventures, when asked about why his team decided to join the space. “I’ve always defined sports as competitive entertainment, and whenever you’ve got competition that people are watching to be entertained, that to me is what sports is about.” Simmelkjaer touched on how there are still people who question whether eSports are “real” sports, which he says is an argument that doesn’t make sense: “It’s got people who are passionate about it, both playing it and watching it [and] lines up with our desire to reach as many audiences as we can around the country, of all demographics, of all interests.”

ESPN is another media company making a major push into eSports, which is surprising considering the somewhat controversial comments president John Skipper made not too long ago. “It’s not a sport,” he claimed in 2014 at Recode’s Code/Media Series event in New York City. “It’s a competition. Chess is a competition. Checkers is a competition. Mostly, I’m interested in doing real sports.” Despite that, ESPN really started embracing eSports in 2015, when it broadcasted a pro gaming tournament (Blizzard’s Heroes of the Storm) on ESPN2 for the first time ever. The year before that, the network streamed a League of Legends competition online, but giving eSports a slot on actual TV was quite a significant move.

“We are at a point now where fans no longer question why we’re covering an eSports event, but are asking for more.”

That strategy shouldn’t come as a surprise, though, since ESPN’s first-ever eSports stream netted the network more viewers than that year’s NBA Finals and the last game of MLB’s 2014 World Series. League of Legends on its own is estimated to be a $1 billion-per-year business, so it’s only natural that ESPN, NBC, Turner (owner of TBS) would want to get involved. In its latest report about the eSports industry, research firm Newzoo said it expects competitive gaming to reach yearly revenues of $1.5 billion by 2020.

“eSports has been around for some time, but its trajectory is still exciting to us because it allows us to experiment with various content, coverage and distribution platforms,” says Kevin Lopes, director of programming and acquisitions at ESPN, says. “We are at a point now where fans no longer question why we’re covering an eSports event, but are asking for more.”

There are growing pains, however. For instance, ESPN forced a player to change the outfit of his Street Fighter V character Cammy during the EVO fighting game championships, because it was deemed too revealing. She was wearing her usual green thong jumpsuit, which obviously showed most of her butt. The network later said it had to abide by “Broadcast Standards,” but Lopes says it’s about something bigger than that. “One of the goals for our coverage is to highlight and celebrate the diversity, inclusiveness and sportsmanship of eSports,” he says. In other words, ESPN probably wants to change the course on gaming’s long history of objectifying female characters — and rightly so.

Organizations like ESPN and NBC aren’t the only ones making efforts in eSports. The National Basketball Association, along with developer and publisher Two-Take Interactive, is developing a new competition called the “NBA 2K eLeague.” A first of its kind, it will feature esquads that will represent 17 NBA teams, including the Boston Celtics, Cleveland Cavaliers, Dallas Mavericks, Golden State Warriors and New York Knicks. The inaugural season is set to take place in 2018, and the pro gamers who participate will get the full NBA treatment: health benefits, training, personal development, sponsorships and more.

“It may be a different kind of physical prowess in terms of reflexes and your ability to move your thumbs very quickly, but these athletes can be any shape or size, and any age, and from anywhere.”

“Physical prowess, at least the way it’s necessary on an NBA court, will no longer be necessary,” said NBA Commissioner Adam Silver during a press conference at All-Star Weekend in March. “It may be a different kind of physical prowess in terms of reflexes and your ability to move your thumbs very quickly, but these athletes can be any shape or size, and any age, and from anywhere.” According to the NBA, each of its 30 teams will eventually have their own eSports squad, though it’s unclear when exactly that’s going to happen.

If the 2K eLeague ends up being successful, don’t be shocked to see other major US sports organizations like the NFL, MLB or MLS follow suit. In Europe, we’ve already seen football (er, soccer) teams such as Manchester City and West Ham recruit their own FIFA gaming stars, while others such as German club FC Schalke 04 have acquired renowned League of Legends crew “Elements.”

Source: https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/21/how-the-traditional-sports-world-is-embracing-esports/