Agoracom Blog Home

Archive for the ‘Tartisan Resources’ Category

Tartisan $TN.ca – #Nickel Rush Restarts As Steel And Battery Demand Rises $ROX.ca $FF.ca $EDG.ca $AGL.ca $ANZ.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 11:48 AM on Tuesday, June 9th, 2020

SPONSOR: Tartisan Nickel (TN:CSE)  Kenbridge Property has a measured and indicated resource of 7.14 million tonnes at 0.62% nickel, 0.33% copper. Tartisan also has interests in Peru, including a 20 percent equity stake in Eloro Resources and 2 percent NSR in their La Victoria property. Click her for more information

Tc logo in black

Nickel Rush Restarts As Steel And Battery Demand Rises

  • Hints of something significant brewing in nickel can be found in the growing number of deals in the metal, especially a high-risk move by a small Australian mining company to buy the big but troubled Goro project on the Pacific island of New Caledonia
  • Latest developments in nickel indicate that the rush to build a position ahead of an EV revival is underway, with EV demand a key factor in BHP Group, the world’s biggest miner, retaining an interest in nickel after several years of trying to sell its Australian nickel assets

By: Tim Treadgold

China’s rapid exit from its Covid-19 lockdown has triggered the restart of a rush for nickel, an old-fashioned metal mainly used in making stainless steel, but also a key ingredient in the batteries of electric vehicles.

While not yet attracting the eye of investors in the same way iron ore has with its 30% rise to $100 a ton there has been a strong flow of deals and a hint of stockpiling ahead of a possible nickel shortage.

Bags filled with nickel briquette and nickel powder sit in a warehouse at the BHP Group Ltd. Kwinana … [+] © 2019 Bloomberg Finance LP

Over the past two months the price of nickel has risen by 15%, admittedly off a pandemic low of $5 a pound to $5.75, potentially heading back to $8/lb, where it was last October.

No-one is yet talking about a higher target, the return to a time in 2007 when nickel was fetching more than $20/lb, but the there is growing confidence that nickel is heading back into boom conditions.

Hints of something significant brewing in nickel can be found in the growing number of deals in the metal, especially a high-risk move by a small Australian mining company to buy the big but troubled Goro project on the Pacific island of New Caledonia.

Goro nickel processing plant on the Pacific island of New Caledonia: Photographer Fred Payet/AFP … [+] AFP via Getty Images

At the same time as the sale of Goro made waves in the commodities world an investment bank detected anomalies in the Chinese nickel market in what looks to be a repeat of events last October when there were signs of an attempt to corner the nickel market.

Back then, speculators were very active in nickel because of a belief that demand from battery makers could quickly match demand from stainless steel makers, an event postponed thanks to a collapse in electric vehicle (EV) demand.

The latest developments in nickel indicate that the rush to build a position ahead of an EV revival is underway, with EV demand a key factor in BHP Group, the world’s biggest miner, retaining an interest in nickel after several years of trying to sell its Australian nickel assets.

Stockpiles Building

Macquarie Bank noted earlier this week an unusual development in nickel and other industrial metals which indicated a “non-reported” build up of stockpiles which pointed to demand running ahead of consumption.

One possible result of an excessive build up in stocks is a future price fall, unless consumption catches up.

An alternative view explored last week by Macquarie is that Chinese steel and battery markers are concerned about a future shortfall developing in nickel supply, especially from major suppliers such as Indonesia which has banned the export of unprocessed nickel ore.

Nickel mining in Soroako, South Sulawesi, Indonesia. Photo by Hariandi Hafid/SOPA Images/LightRocket … [+] LightRocket via Getty Images

Other investment banks doubt there is an immediate threat to nickel supplies because of the damage done to demand by the global economic slowdown. Citi argues that nickel has the most downside potential of the industrial metals with a surplus likely for the next three years before a deficit develops in 2024.

But concern about a weaker outlook for the nickel price does not sit easily with the proposal by New Century Zinc to acquire the loss-making Goro project from Brazil’s biggest mining company, Vale, or for other recent nickel deals.

Nickel Deal Flow Accelerating

Corporate moves in nickel include Western Areas, an Australian nickel miner, buying a 20% stake in a rival nickel stock, Panoramic Resources, and the acquisition of a 5% stake in emerging Brazilian nickel producer, Centaurus Metals by rich private investor, Kerry Harmanis, a man who made $500 million in 2007 with a well-timed exit from the nickel business when he sold Jubilee Mines to Xstrata.

The two key points in what’s happening with nickel are the development of a major new market in rechargeable batteries and its time-worn reputation for extreme cyclical moves, up and down, and while the last genuine nickel boom was 13 years ago there is a pattern developing in the price of the metal.

Since hitting its recent low of $3.50/lb in early 2016 nickel has made three strong recovery moves. Firstly with a rise to $5/lb in 2017, then up to $7/lb in 2018 followed by a rise to just above $8/lb last year.

The flurry of corporate activity among nickel mining companies, coupled with hints of hidden stockpiling in China and the combination of stronger than expected demand from stainless steel mills and an expected surge in demand for EVs point to nickel being in the early stages of a fresh upward price move.

Source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/timtreadgold/2020/06/04/nickel-rush-restarts-as-steel-and-battery-demand-rises/#3e3b7c228ab7

Tartisan #Nickel $TN.ca – #Volkswagen to start using high- #nickel #EV #batteries $ROX.ca $FF.ca $EDG.ca $AGL.ca $ANZ.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 3:46 PM on Wednesday, March 18th, 2020

SPONSOR: Tartisan Nickel (TN:CSE)  Kenbridge Property has a measured and indicated resource of 7.14 million tonnes at 0.62% nickel, 0.33% copper. Tartisan also has interests in Peru, including a 20 percent equity stake in Eloro Resources and 2 percent NSR in their La Victoria property. Click her for more information

Tc logo in black

—————————-

Volkswagen to start using high-nickel EV batteries

  • Volkswagen is aiming to produce 3 million electric cars by 2025.
  • Company is also embarking on producing EV battery as well.

Reuters

FRANKFURT: Volkswagen will raise the amount of nickel used in it electric car battery cells to 80% in the next year from 65% at present, Frank Blome, head of battery cells at the carmaker said on Tuesday.

Volkswagen’s current electric car battery cell contains 65% nickel, 15% cobalt and 20% manganese. Next generation batteries will have 80% nickel, 10% cobalt and 10% manganese, Blome told analysts on a call.

Volkswagen is embarking on a mass production push to build 3 million electric cars by 2025, requiring 300 gigawatt hours worth of battery cells, mainly in Asia and Europe, he said.

Ramping up manufacturing battery packs at scale will help the carmaker to cut battery cell costs far below $100 per kilowatt hour by 2025, he said.

Source: https://auto.economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/auto-components/volkswagen-to-start-using-high-nickel-ev-batteries/74684883

Tartisan #Nickel $TN.ca – Monthly Nickel News For July 2019 $ROX.ca $FF.ca $EDG.ca $AGL.ca $ANZ.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 4:19 PM on Wednesday, July 31st, 2019

SPONSOR: Tartisan Nickel (TN:CSE)  Kenbridge Property has a measured and indicated resource of 7.14 million tonnes at 0.62% nickel, 0.33% copper. Tartisan also has interests in Peru, including a 20 percent equity stake in Eloro Resources and 2 percent NSR in their La Victoria property. Click her for more information

Tc logo in black
TN: CSE
Fact Sheet
—————————-

Summary

  • Nickel spot prices were up sharply in July, and the LME inventory was lower and remains near a 7 year low.
  • Nickel market news – Forecasters are generally bullish on the outlook for nickel.
  • Nickel company news – Anglo American to return up to $1 billion to shareholders.

Matt Bohlsen Investment advisor, portfolio strategy, growth at reasonable price

Welcome to the nickel miners news for July. The past month saw nickel prices rise sharply and LME inventories fall again and remain near a ~7 year low. Most other base and EV metals declined but nickel is rising, most likely due to the very low inventory levels and strong demand boosted by the EV sector.

Nickel price news

As of July 25, the nickel spot price was US$6.35/lb, up sharply (13%) from US$5.62 last month.

The following charts show that the excess nickel inventories since 2013 have been worked off now and nickel prices are finally starting to respond higher. It may still take a few months to play out, but 2020 should be a good year for nickel (assuming China does ok).

On March 2018 I “Top 5 Nickel Miners To Consider Before The Nickel Boom” stating:

2016 was lithium’s year, 2017 was cobalt’s year, and 2018-2020 are likely to be nickel’s years as nickel inventories decline and nickel prices finally start to rise. Strong Chinese and global stainless steel demand and ever increasing demand from electric vehicles [EVs] using higher nickel content batteries NMC (8:1:1).

Note: The US-China trade war has subdued China’s growth and reduced sentiment, which has not helped nickel prices the past year.

Nickel spot prices – 5-year chart – USD 6.35/lb

Source: InfoMine.com

Nickel 30 year price chart

Source: InfoMine.com

London Metals Exchange [LME] nickel 5 year inventory

The chart below shows LME nickel inventory was lower in July at a ~7 year low.

Source: InfoMine.com

10 year nickel inventory – Nickel at a ~7 year low

Source: InfoMine.com

Nickel demand v supply

The chart below shows nickel is forecast to be in deficit after ~2020-2022 (or at least require new supply to come online).

Source: Wood Mackenzie

Note: Some others such as BMI have been forecasting a nickel surplus by 2020 due to increased Indonesian production and reduced Asian demand.

As a reminder the November 2017 McKinsey report stated: “If annual electric vehicle [EV] production reaches 31 million vehicles by 2025 as expected then demand for high-purity class 1 nickel is likely to increase significantly from 33 Kt in 2017 to 570 Kt in 2025.” That is a 17 fold increase in just 8 years, albeit only on Class 1 nickel.

Source: https://seekingalpha.com/article/4279565-nickel-monthly-news-month-july-2019

Tartisan #Nickel $TN.ca – #Tesla $TSLA: How #Elon Musk’s “Terawatt-Hour” Battery Plan May Spark Shift to Clean Energy $ROX.ca $FF.ca $EDG.ca $AGL.ca $ANZ.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 11:10 AM on Monday, July 29th, 2019

SPONSOR: Tartisan Nickel (TN:CSE)  Kenbridge Property has a measured and indicated resource of 7.14 million tonnes at 0.62% nickel, 0.33% copper. Tartisan also has interests in Peru, including a 20 percent equity stake in Eloro Resources and 2 percent NSR in their La Victoria property. Click her for more information

Tesla: How Elon Musk’s “Terawatt-Hour” Battery Plan May Spark Shift to Clean Energy

Musk says it’s terawatt-or-bust.

By Mike Brown July 25, 2019 Filed Under Batteries, Clean Energy, Elon Musk, Energy, Sustainable Energy & Tesla

  • Elon Musk wants to transition the world onto renewable energy sources, but to do so, the world’s going to need a lot more energy storage.
  • The CEO outlined a new battery production goal during Tesla’s second-quarter earnings call on Wednesday, hinting that the company could eventually produce multiple terawatt-hours of storage per year.

“In order to really make a fundamental shift in the world’s energy usage and really transform things to a sustainable energy future, if you’re not in the terawatt-hour range, it’s like, it’s a nice news story but it is not fundamentally changing the energy equation,” Musk told investors during the afternoon conference call.

It’s the sort of move that could spark a bigger jump to renewables. Batteries are vital for renewable energy because they ensure a steady stream of power throughout the day.

After all, when the sun isn’t shining and the wind isn’t blowing, solar and wind generators aren’t going to keep the lights on.

The Tesla-built Hornsdale battery in Australia, completed in November 2017, uses 129 megawatt-hours to store wind energy from nearby turbines and provide enough power for 30,000 homes. The Arsenal Football Club in London has a large enough battery to power the stadium for an entire 90-minute match, and GivePower is using batteries and solar to run a desalination plant 24 hours a day.

GivePower in Kiyunga.

In the wake of booming demand and a need for more capacity, battery production is soaring. Benchmark Minerals states that annual global production jumped from 19 gigawatt-hours in 2010 to 160 gigawatt-hours in 2019.

A staggering 68 plants could add a further 1.45 terawatt-hours to the mix by 2028.

There is still a long way to go: The IEA estimates that global electricity demand reached 23,000 terawatt-hours last year. Renewables accounted for around 24 percent of electricity in 2017, a figure that could reach 30 percent by 2023.

Of course, it’s not necessary to produce enough batteries to hold all of the world’s energy at once. Musk previously stated that 100 of his company’s Gigafactories could produce enough storage to transition the world onto sustainable energy. With Musk planning to send Tesla’s production skyrocketing, it could bring this goal within squinting distance.

The Tesla battery in South Australia.

Elon Musk’s Terawatt-Hour Plan: How It Currently Stacks Up

Tesla’s Gigafactory behemoth in the Nevada desert reached an annual production rate of 20 gigawatt-hours in August 2018. That in and of itself was an achievement, as it made the firm the largest producer of battery power in the world, and it meant that Tesla produces more capacity than all other automakers combined.

The Gigafactory now produces around 28 gigawatt-hours of battery capacity per year, Musk 

Work on the Gigafactory is not complete. The company is aiming to reach an annual production rate of 150 gigawatt-hours of battery pack production per year. This would be a rate that Musk has previously described as “faster than bullets leaving a machine gun.”

Musk has stated that 100 such factories would be enough to transition the world onto sustainable energy.

But none of this is enough for Musk, who now wants to see the company reach “multiple terawatt-hours per year.”

More information about this goal could come soon. Musk suggested that a battery day, similar to the autonomous driving day, could offer “a comprehensive review of cell chemistry, module and pack, architecture, and a manufacturing plan that has a clear roadmap to a terawatt-hour per year.” That could arrive sometime between February and March 2020.

Tesla is planning to launch new vehicles next year, like the second-generation Roadster, Model Y SUV, and Semi truck.

But beyond these new vehicles, Tesla’s batteries could be used to help shift the markets to ditch dirty energy sources once and for all.

Source: https://www.inverse.com/article/58024-tesla-how-elon-musk-s-terawatt-hour-plan-may-spark-shift-to-clean-energy

Tartisan #Nickel $TN.ca – The biggest themes in global natural resources today #Nickel #Cobalt #Lithium $ROX.ca $FF.ca $EDG.ca $AGL.ca $ANZ.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 9:00 AM on Thursday, May 30th, 2019

SPONSOR: Tartisan Nickel (TN:CSE)  Kenbridge Property has a measured and indicated resource of 7.14 million tonnes at 0.62% nickel, 0.33% copper. Tartisan also has interests in Peru, including a 20 percent equity stake in Eloro Resources and 2 percent NSR in their La Victoria property. Click her for more information

Tc logo in black
TN: CSE
Fact Sheet
—————————-

The biggest themes in global natural resources today

  • Ongoing trend towards the electrification of vehicles will likely benefit lithium and other metals such as copper, nickel and cobalt
  • This is a significant change and is being driven by better technology, legislative restrictions on pollution in cities and consumer demand for more environmentally-acceptable transport

Alex Cowie

The global natural resources sector, including mining and energy, as well as agriculture, is about four times bigger than the entire Australian equity market. Sifting through this massive and diverse universe for opportunities is Daniel Sullivan, Co-Head of Global Natural Resources at Janus Henderson Investors.

In our recent Q&A, Daniel explains why he thinks this sector will undergo more change in the next 20 years than the last century and talks through the big themes investors should have on their radar, including the seismic shifts taking place in energy. 

Daniel also looks at where the rejuvenated mining sector could go next and shares some of his thoughts on lithium, coal, gold, LNG, as well as renewable energy and agricultural commodities. 

Read on for this fascinating discussion that goes well beyond the local resource themes to reveal a truly global perspective on this vast and rapidly evolving global industry.  

Q: Please explain what you do in your role as though someone at a dinner party asked you. What are some of the most enjoyable aspects of your work?

When people ask me what I do for a living, I tell them that I invest in companies around the world in the mining, energy and agriculture sectors on behalf of investors. To bring natural resources into a more relatable context, I ask them to look around – at the clothes they are wearing, the phone in their pockets, the food on their dinner plate and even the building over their head and to understand that every component of every item was derived from natural resources. 

Natural resources underpin our society – and for me, that makes the sector a fascinating place to invest. Ours is a sector with an enormous variety of companies, with constant changes in market dynamics across the three sub-sectors giving us a lot to work with and to think about.

Q: What is the big opportunity in your investible universe that the market has not fully appreciated?

We believe the long-term demand for metals, energy and agricultural output will remain strong as the world continues to grow and urbanise; billions of people’s needs must be catered for.

The next twenty years will see more change than was witnessed over the past century, with access to vast numbers of young people and technology available to help solve incredibly complex problems. The companies in our investment space that align to these changes are likely to grow at much higher rates than their peers and become more highly valued over time. This has begun in earnest in the past few years and appears to be accelerating. Rapid change is being discussed in the largest resource companies in the world and this will likely continue to gain momentum.

Q: Agriculture has seen some major developments in genomics, why is this an interesting theme to watch?

The sequencing of the wheat genome will prove to be a major breakthrough for food production in more challenging agricultural areas, boosting incomes and development for many people.

The interaction of genetics, climate, fertiliser and crop protection to deliver better quality produce and improved farmer/supplier economics is always being played out. Corteva Agriscience, the agricultural company being spun out from the merger of Dow and DuPont is an interesting example of a specialist company in this area.

Q: Changing dietary habits of the surging Asian middle class is often cited as a driver for increased protein production. Is this an area you see good opportunities, and if so, how can investors play this?

While China has the world’s largest rates of pork production and consumption, they are largely self-sufficient, meaning there is limited opportunity. That said, we have invested in the leading producers of high quality agricultural products, including milk powder, berries, apples and salmon, which have seen strong growth resulting from the Asian middle class thematic.

Looking at the upstream opportunities from this theme, our investments in seed and fertiliser companies benefitted from the boom in soybean production in Brazil and the US. Over the past 10 years, China has been a major soybean importer.

Q: On a sector basis, mining saw the strongest dividend growth of all last calendar year, with the local big miners BHP and RIO certainly reminding us that miners can actually generate a yield too. Has this return to form of resource stocks as income stocks been a big factor in your investment strategy, and what are you expecting over the medium term in this regard?

The mining sector is currently in a very favourable position, having come through the five-year downturn with reduced capital and operating costs and much lower debt. As a result, in the upturn of the past three years, cash flows have been very significant. Coupled with the sale of non-core assets, cash returns to shareholders have been high. Many of these businesses are in great shape operationally and financially. We expect that they will remain disciplined with capital allocation and continue to drive high returns back to shareholders. This is likely to result in a re-rating from investors.

Q: I understand you have some exposure to the lithium majors. How big an opportunity do you think the battery minerals thematic will be in reality over the next 3-5 years, and where in the supply chain will the best opportunities be?

The ongoing trend towards the electrification of vehicles will likely benefit lithium and other metals such as copper, nickel and cobalt. This is a significant change and is being driven by better technology, legislative restrictions on pollution in cities and consumer demand for more environmentally-acceptable transport. However, we do expect progress to be a little stop-start and significant demand changes may not occur until post-2025.

Q: How does the M&A current in play among the global gold majors mean for the rest of the sector, and what does it tell us about the current state of the industry?

The major gold producers have generally been poor performers and have failed to deliver the significant cash returns seen in the major diversified companies. The recent spate of mergers has been disappointing as they have generally been conducted at low or no premium. Despite being on the right side of the Barrick-Randgold, Newmont-Goldcorp and Barrick-Newmont merger proposals, these have not generated significant performance for our strategy. Where we have historically seen better opportunities has been in explorer-developers, with significant value generation through resource discovery and the successful progression through to development.

Q: Given the recent reversal in Fed policy, it is easy to take a positive view on the gold price from here; do you have a view on gold, and does it influence your strategy?

As a team we tend not to have a strong view on commodity prices – and this includes gold – but we do acknowledge there is a monetary and safety aspect to gold that could see significant price appreciation in crises or monetary realignment. Having said that, there has been no significant value generated from these themes and we are much more interested in real companies operating on the ground to find and develop quality gold mines.

Q: Given the chronic underinvestment in exploration and development assets by the majors since the GFC, how big an opportunity is there in investing in quality juniors, and in which sector are you seeing the best opportunities in this regard?

Part of the problem with a significant downturn is the withdrawal of capital from many junior companies. Many of the promising projects of the past five years were shut down and are only now re-emerging with some small capital raisings recommencing this year. Exploration and development are long term cycles, often seven years or more, so the world has lost a cycle of projects in this downturn. We do need to be mindful of liquidity and this means being cautious in taking on juniors.

Q: What was your take on the recent banning of Australian coal imports at some Chinese ports, and how big a potential risk do you think it is for the majors; i.e.: should we expect more of this?

China is very complex and the interplay between policy, demand, pricing and preferences can be hard to understand. Of their total demand for coal, imported coal is a small component. They have also pivoted very strongly to liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports over the last two years. Across 2018, the markets worked through the tariff disputes, continued economic maturation and more recently, the Lunar New year periods, each of which reduces activity and demand growth.

Q: What is the most interesting theme in energy (including sustainable energy) right now? Please explain why it matters.

For the world’s largest energy companies, gas has become the transitional fuel. This has been seen with major LNG projects built and planned by all the large companies. There has also been a pivot to electricity and trading, and we saw a general sell down away from oil sands. 

The true pivot to renewables will be difficult for companies of this size, but they are increasing investment into wind and solar projects. More interesting are the smaller companies that are still discovering and developing high quality, low cost and growth projects. We have a favourable view of the long term growth of renewable energy and the storage of electricity, but these opportunities are not as common in listed markets.

Q: While Australia only makes up a small part of your investable universe, what do you see as the globally significant themes within the Australian resources sector?

It’s true that our global natural resources investable universe is many times the size of the Australian resources sector, in fact, the market cap of the global resources sector is about four times the market cap of the entire Australian equity market. That said, Australia has a very strong mining heritage and has also grown its energy industry in recent years to become the world’s second largest LNG exporter after Qatar. With a good entrepreneurial culture in Perth, Australia continues to contribute to mineral exploration and development of global significance. With the recent lithium demand growth and price boom, Western Australia has delivered six new mining developments.

Q: What was the last thing you read that really blew you away, and why?

To get a sense of the potential changes that might be just around the corner you should watch Tony Seba, presenting on “Clean Disruption of Energy and Transportation”. 

A similar thought-provoking article is “This is how big oil will die” 

Source: https://www.livewiremarkets.com/wires/the-biggest-themes-in-global-natural-resources-today

Tartisan Nickel $TN.ca – Demand growth, falling stocks boon for #Nickel $ROX.ca $FF.ca $EDG.ca $AGL.ca $ANZ.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 9:45 PM on Sunday, April 14th, 2019

SPONSOR: Tartisan Nickel (TN:CSE)  Kenbridge Property has a measured and indicated resource of 7.14 million tonnes at 0.62% nickel, 0.33% copper. Tartisan also has interests in Peru, including a 20 percent equity stake in Eloro Resources and 2 percent NSR in their La Victoria property. Click her for more information

Tc logo in black
TN: CSE
Fact Sheet
—————————-

Demand growth, falling stocks boon for Ni

  • Healthy growth in nickel demand from the stainless steel and battery sectors and shrinking inventories on the Shanghai Futures Exchange and London Metal Exchange bode well for nickel prices
  • Nickel inventories at both LME and SHFE warehouses have been on a downward trajectory since 2018
  • Stainless steel demand still dominates, but EV sector grows faster

By: Violet Li

Healthy growth in nickel demand from the stainless steel and battery sectors and shrinking inventories on the Shanghai Futures Exchange and London Metal Exchange bode well for nickel prices, Macquarie Capital senior commodities consultant Jim Lennon said.

“Our view is that we have these two drivers in demand: stainless steel and batteries, and nickel inventories have been falling over the last few years. I think it will [continue to] fall over the next few years; the nickel market will remain in a deficit between supply and demand, which should push prices higher,” Lennon said at Fastmarkets Battery Materials Conference in Shanghai on Thursday April 11.

Lennon did not give a breakdown of the forecast price at the presentation.

Nickel inventories at both LME and SHFE warehouses have been on a downward trajectory since 2018. LME nickel stocks totaled 182,446 tonnes as of April 1, down by 50% from 368,430 tonnes on January 1, 2018.

Meanwhile, nickel stocks in SHFE-approved warehouses fell by 80% during the same period, to 9,749 tonnes on April 4 from 48,920 tonnes on January 1, 2018.

Lennon concluded the large decline in stock levels reflects deficits and some financial buying of stocks.

“Last year there’s probably about 50,000 tonnes of inventories transferred from the LME warehouses in Asia into non-reported inventories in Europe, held by banks and traders, partly for reasons of a positive outlook for the market or better premiums in the European area,” Lennon said.

Stainless steel demand still dominates, but EV sector grows faster
Stainless steel takes up 70% of global nickel usage compared with a small fraction of 6% of nickel used by the electric vehicle (EV) sector, Lennon said. But EV demand growth is speeding up, he said.

“Total world production of stainless steel in 2016 grew by 8.5%, 2017 by 6% and last year by 5%. This year, our projection is 3.5-4%, so we do see some slowdown but still a steady growth rate. Nickel usage in batteries will grow by 30-40% [in 2019], so the underlying growth in nickel [consumption] continues to be quite impressive,” Lennon said.

Notably, more nickel briquette was used in the EV sector following rising demand for batteries and this has raised the nickel briquette premium over the past year.

Fastmarkets MB’s monthly duty-free nickel briquette premium cif Shanghai stood at $240-270 per tonne at the end of March, up from $220-260 per tonne at the launch of the assessment in August last year.

Nickel briquette is the one of the main raw materials of nickel sulfate, a key material used in the production of nickel-cobalt-manganese (NCM) and nickel-cobalt-aluminium (NCA) batteries used in EVs.

Source: https://www.amm.com/Article/3868517/Demand-growth-falling-stocks-boon-for-Ni.html

CLIENT FEATURE: Tartisan Nickel (TN:CSE) Kenbridge Property Hosts M&I Resource of 7.14 Million Tonnes at 0.62% Nickel, 0.33% Copper

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 11:20 AM on Friday, March 1st, 2019

Investment Highlights

  • Kenbridge property has a measured and indicated resource of 7.14 million tonnes at 0.62% nickel, 0.33% copper
  • 17.5 (21.8 fully diluted) percent equity stake in Eloro Resources and 2 percent NSR in their La Victoria property

Kenbridge Ni Project (ON, Canada)

  • Advanced  stage  deposit  remains open  in  three  directions,  is  equipped with a 623m  deep  shaft  and  has  never  been  mined. 
  • Preliminary  Economic Assessment completed and updated returned robust project 
    economics and operating costs including  a  NPV  of  C$253M  and  cash costs of US$3.47/lb of nickel net of  
    copper credits.
  • Plans for Kenbridge include updating PEA, advancing the project through to feasibility and exploring the open mineralization at depth

FULL DISCLOSURE: Tartisan Nickel Corp. is an advertising client of AGORA Internet Relations Corp.

CLIENT FEATURE: Tartisan Nickel $TN.ca Kenbridge Property Hosts M&I Resource of 7.14 Million Tonnes at 0.62% Nickel, 0.33% Copper $ROX.ca $FF.ca $EDG.ca $AGL.ca $ANZ.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 11:25 AM on Thursday, February 21st, 2019

Investment Highlights

  • Kenbridge property has a measured and indicated resource of 7.14 million tonnes at 0.62% nickel, 0.33% copper
  • 17.5 (21.8 fully diluted) percent equity stake in Eloro Resources and 2 percent NSR in their La Victoria property

Kenbridge Ni Project (ON, Canada)

  • Advanced  stage  deposit  remains open  in  three  directions,  is  equipped with a 623m  deep  shaft  and  has  never  been  mined. 
  • Preliminary  Economic Assessment completed and updated returned robust project 
    economics and operating costs including  a  NPV  of  C$253M  and  cash costs of US$3.47/lb of nickel net of  
    copper credits.
  • Plans for Kenbridge include updating PEA, advancing the project through to feasibility and exploring the open mineralization at depth

FULL DISCLOSURE: Tartisan Nickel Corp. is an advertising client of AGORA Internet Relations Corp.

CLIENT FEATURE: Tartisan Nickel $TN.ca Kenbridge Property Hosts M&I Resource of 7.14 Million Tonnes at 0.62% Nickel, 0.33% Copper

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 11:17 AM on Thursday, January 10th, 2019

Investment Highlights

  • Kenbridge property has a measured and indicated resource of 7.14 million tonnes at 0.62% nickel, 0.33% copper
  • 17.5 (21.8 fully diluted) percent equity stake in Eloro Resources and 2 percent NSR in their La Victoria property

Kenbridge Ni Project (ON, Canada)

  • Advanced  stage  deposit  remains open  in  three  directions,  is  equipped with a 623m  deep  shaft  and  has  never  been  mined. 
  • Preliminary  Economic Assessment completed and updated returned robust project 
    economics and operating costs including  a  NPV  of  C$253M  and  cash costs of US$3.47/lb of nickel net of  
    copper credits.
  • Plans for Kenbridge include updating PEA, advancing the project through to feasibility and exploring the open mineralization at depth

FULL DISCLOSURE: Tartisan Nickel Corp. is an advertising client of AGORA Internet Relations Corp.

Tartisan Nickel $TN.ca – Nickel To See A “Fundamental Shift” In Supply And Demand $ROX.ca $FF.ca $EDG.ca $AGL.ca $ANZ.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 5:58 PM on Wednesday, November 28th, 2018

SPONSOR: Tartisan Nickel (TN:CSE)  Kenbridge Property has a measured and indicated resource of 7.14 million tonnes at 0.62% nickel, 0.33% copper. Tartisan also has interests in Peru, including a 20 percent equity stake in Eloro Resources and 2 percent NSR in their La Victoria property. Click her for more information

Tc logo in black

————–

Guest(s): Mark Jarvis President, CEO & Director, Giga Metals

Although batteries still account for a relatively small portion of nickel demand, the electrification of cars is growing that source of demand significantly, this according to Mark Jarvis, president and CEO of Giga Metals.
“The steady march of electric vehicles is a fundamental shift in the supply-demand equation, especially for class 1 nickel,” Jarvis told Kitco News on the sidelines of the Swiss Mining Institute Conference in Geneva.

WATCH INTERVIEW HERE

Source:Read More