Agoracom Blog Home

Posts Tagged ‘lithium]’

European Commission Adds Lithium to Critical Raw Materials List SPONSOR: St-Georges Eco-Mining $SX.ca $NNX.ca $OM.ca $ICM.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-Eric at 12:48 PM on Friday, September 11th, 2020

EC reports highlighted an overlap between the location battery raw materials resources in the EU and “regions that are heavily dependent on coal or carbon-intensive industries and where battery factories are planned”. Image: EC Joint Centre for Research.

Lithium has been added to a list of raw materials deemed essential to secure supply in Europe, for the first time ever, by the European Commission.

Earlier this month the Commission presented its Action Plan on Critical Raw Materials and a “foresight study” on critical raw materials looking ahead to 2030 and 2050, as well as its updated 2020 list of materials. This list is updated every three years and identifies the raw materials that the Commission said are “most important economically and have a high supply risk”.

A statement from the EC also talked about the importance of access to certain resources to deliver the European Green Deal while preventing the shift to carbon neutrality from becoming also a shift from dependency on fossil fuels to a dependency on raw materials. This week, Members of European Parliament spoke at a webinar hosted by European energy storage industry group EASE about the vital importance of energy storage for decarbonising the continent while also ensuring security of energy supply.

The EC’s documents likewise firmly emphasised the importance of battery raw materials. While cobalt is already on that list, and lithium was added this year, the EC said it will “monitor nickel closely,” given the metal’s importance in battery production. Vanadium, used in flow batteries – as well as in steel production – is also on the 2020 list.

“A secure and sustainable supply of raw materials is a prerequisite for a resilient economy. For e-car batteries and energy storage alone, Europe will for instance need up to 18 times more lithium by 2030 and up to 60 times more by 2050,” said European Commission politician Maroš Šefčovič, who has championed the need to create battery supply chains and manufacturing capabilities in the continent.

“As our foresight shows, we cannot allow to replace current reliance on fossil fuels with dependency on critical raw materials. This has been magnified by the coronavirus disruptions in our strategic value chains.”

Šefčovič, the EC’s Vice-President for Interinstitutional Relations and Foresight, was instrumental in the creation of the European Battery Alliance, which has committed to investing billions of Euros into the manufacturing value chain on the continent over the next few years.

One of the projects to benefit from that Alliance, start-up Northvolt’s first gigafactory in Sweden, received its first processing equipment a few days ago, the company said. Now, the European Commission is set to formulate a similar Alliance for Critical Raw Materials.

SOURCE: https://www.energy-storage.news/news/european-commission-adds-lithium-to-critical-raw-materials-list

Iconic $ICM.ca Initiates Drilling Program at Bonnie Claire Lithium Project, Nevada $LI.ca $MGG.ca $PAC.ca $CYP.ca $NEV.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 9:12 AM on Tuesday, August 11th, 2020
  • Announced that it has mobilized a drill crew and drilling equipment to the Bonnie Claire Lithium Deposit in Nevada
  • Exploration program will consist of 3-5 vertical reverse circulation (RC) holes 90-120 meters (300-400 feet) in depth and 2 vertical core holes 90-120 meters (300-400 feet) in depth

Vancouver, British Columbia–(August 11, 2020) – Iconic Minerals Ltd. (TSXV: ICM) (OTC Pink: BVTEF) (FSE: YQGB) (“Company” or “Iconic”) is pleased to announce that it has mobilized a drill crew and drilling equipment to the Bonnie Claire Lithium Deposit in Nevada. The drilling contract was signed with Harris Exploration Drilling of Fallon, Nevada, for both core and RC drilling.

The exploration program will consist of 3-5 vertical reverse circulation (RC) holes 90-120 meters (300-400 feet) in depth and 2 vertical core holes 90-120 meters (300-400 feet) in depth (the “Drill Holes”). The RC drilling will provide additional samples for metallurgical testing as well as expand the existing resource. The core holes will be the first drilled on the Bonnie Claire Project, and will be used in engineering studies for a Preliminary Economic Assessment (PEA).

All of the planned Drill Holes are south of Iconic’s previous deep drilling (BC1601-1801) in an area of linear lithium anomalies found by surface grid sampling. It is hoped that the sediment hosted lithium will begin very shallow in this area which may allow for future bulk sampling using an excavator. In past drilling the shallowest depth of lithium rich sediments that was intercepted was at 6 meters (20 feet) and contained +600 ppm Li, which increased at depth with Li values up to 2250ppm. In addition to collecting the sediments for testing, because the surface anomalies may indicate near-surface lithium brine, preliminary semi-quantitative brine samples will also be taken from all holes during drilling.

The Bonnie Claire Lithium Property Characteristics:

The Property is located within Sarcobatus Valley that is approximately 30 km (19 miles) long and 20 km (12 miles) wide. Quartz-rich volcanic tuffs, that contain anomalous amounts of lithium, occur within and adjacent to the valley. Geochemical analysis of the local salt flats has yielded lithium values up to 340 ppm. The gravity low within the valley is 20 km (12 miles) long, and the current estimates of depth to basement rocks range from 600 to 1,200 meters (2,000 to 4,000 feet). The current claim block covers an area of 35 km2 (13.5 mi2) with potential to be underlain by lithium-rich sediments.

On behalf of the Board of Directors

SIGNED: “Richard Kern

Richard Kern, President and CEO
Contact: Keturah Nathe, VP Corporate Development (604) 336-8614

For further information on ICM, please visit our website at www.iconicminerals.com
The Company’s public documents may be accessed at www.sedar.com

Neither the TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.

Iconic $ICM.ca Provides Update on Drilling Program and Phase 2 Metallurgical Testing For Bonnie Claire #Lithium Project, Nevada $LI.ca $MGG.ca $PAC.ca $CYP.ca $NEV.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 10:15 AM on Thursday, February 20th, 2020
  • Announced that it is planning a spring drilling campaign as soon as the weather is conducive for entry into the Bonnie Claire Lithium Deposit in Nevada
  • Iconic has received an update from St-Georges Eco-Mining Corp. regarding Phase 2 metallurgical testing of the lithium-rich sediment from Iconic’s Bonnie Claire lithium deposit in Nevada

Vancouver, British Columbia–(February 20, 2020) – Iconic Minerals Ltd. (TSXV: ICM) (OTC Pink: BVTEF) (FSE: YQGB) (“Company” or “Iconic”) is pleased to announce that it is planning a spring drilling campaign as soon as the weather is conducive for entry into the Bonnie Claire Lithium Deposit in Nevada.

Iconic has received an update from St-Georges Eco-Mining Corp. (“St-George”) (CSE: SX) regarding Phase 2 metallurgical testing of the lithium-rich sediment from Iconic’s Bonnie Claire lithium deposit in Nevada. Iconic is encouraged by this update and is sending additional drill cuttings to meet St-Georges’ requests and allow further progress toward completing the Phase 2 report.

St-Georges is proceeding with the next stages of tests within Phase 2, where its current focus is the optimization of chemicals consumption and purification steps to meet the requirements for lithium hydroxide. Iconic looks forward to receiving further metallurgical results from St Georges.

The Bonnie Claire Lithium Property Characteristics:

The Property is located within Sarcobatus Valley that is approximately 30 km (19 miles) long and 20 km (12 miles) wide. Quartz-rich volcanic tuffs, that contain anomalous amounts of lithium, occur within and adjacent to the valley. Geochemical analysis of the local salt flats has yielded lithium values up to 340 ppm. The gravity low within the valley is 20 km (12 miles) long, and the current estimates of depth to basement rocks range from 600 to 1,200 meters (2,000 to 4,000 feet). The current claim block covers an area of 35 km2 (13.5 mi2) with potential to be underlain by lithium-rich sediments.

On behalf of the Board of Directors

SIGNED: “Richard Kern

Richard Kern, President and CEO
Contact: Keturah Nathe, VP Corporate Development (604) 336-8614

For further information on ICM, please visit our website at www.iconicminerals.com
The Company’s public documents may be accessed at www.sedar.com

Neither the TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.

To view the source version of this press release, please visit https://www.newsfilecorp.com/release/52593

Iconic Minerals $ICM.ca – Better #battery tech could boost #EV range, speed up charging $LI.ca $MGG.ca $PAC.ca $CYP.ca $NEV.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 5:06 PM on Wednesday, November 27th, 2019

SPONSOR: Iconic Minerals Ltd. ICM:TSX-V Bonnie Claire Lithium Property hosts Inferred resource of 11.8 billion pounds of lithium carbonate equivalent and has the potential to be the largest lithium resource globally. Learn More.

Better battery tech could boost EV range, speed up charging

At least if battery manufacturers can keep up with demand as electric power expands.

  • Battery demand is surging as conventional automakers catch EV religion
  • Along with US automakers, German giant Volkswagen now has a massive EV push
  • And Japan’s Toyota, taken by surprise when EV demand grew faster than it expected, is pushing battery-powered car development and working on battery supply deals.

Stephen Shankland November 25, 2019

Ford’s first electric SUV, the Mustang Mach-E, arrives next year, and it shows just how far we’ve come with EVs. Mainstream carmakers like Nissan, General Motors, BMW, Hyundai, Jaguar and Porsche are filling a field that once belonged to counterculture icon Tesla. And better batteries should keep the new models coming.

At the IDTechEx conference this week, startups showed off new battery technology that improves on today’s lithium-ion designs. The developments increase driving range, cut costs, extend useful lifespan, speed up charging and reduce fire risks. That’ll continue the kind of steady progress that’s more common in the computer industry than the car industry.

For now, the improvements are mostly in labs, and many of them won’t arrive until well into the next decade. But they’re an important foundation for the dreams of EV proponents, who want to see conventional cars that belch greenhouse gases replaced by cleaner, quieter electrics. Once passenger cars are plug-in, expect to see electric trucks, tractors, excavators, buses and even airplanes.

Burgeoning battery startups

The most important battery improvement is in energy density, the amount of kilowatt-hours of juice that can be stored in a given mass. That can extend range, cut battery costs and reduce vehicle weight, which in turn improves range. Startups are racing to achieve that and other improvements through changes to anodes, cathodes and other components.

Enevate, an Irvine, California-based startup whose investors include battery giant LG Chem, expects more storage capacity and dramatically faster charging. The company sees charging times dropping to just five minutes for a three-quarter charge. Conventional gas stations could be converted into “drive-through charging stations,” Executive Vice President Jarvis Tou said.

Another, Solid Battery, plans solid-state cells that do away with liquid elements and increase energy density by 50%, according to Chief Executive Douglas Campbell. His company’s approach has “the best blend of performance and manufacturability” and boosts safety, and BMW and Ford have development agreements with the company, he said.

Global Graphene Group also plans to improve batteries by encasing silicon in the anode with graphene, an exotic form of carbon sheets only one atom thick. The result, according to CEO Bor Jang, a longtime graphene researcher, will be batteries costing 30% less and powering EVs with a 700-mile range. Jang expects those batteries can be fully charged in five to 15 minutes.

Will EV demand mean battery shortages?

It all sounds promising, but burgeoning demand could cause battery costs to increase. Indeed, battery supply constraints mean Ford will make only 50,000 Mustang Mach-E vehicles in 2021.

“The demand is going to be enormous,” IDTechEx analyst Peter Harrop said of vehicle batteries. “We keep revising our forecasts upwards.”

Battery demand is surging as conventional automakers catch EV religion. Along with US automakers, German giant Volkswagen now has a massive EV push. And Japan’s Toyota, taken by surprise when EV demand grew faster than it expected, is pushing battery-powered car development and working on battery supply deals.

Electric vehicle sales should increase from 2 million in 2018 to 10 million in 2025, BloombergNEF forecasts. No wonder Tesla, which just announced its Cybertruck pickup on Thursday, is working on building its own batteries.

Analyst firm IDTechEx expects electric vehicles used for construction, agriculture and mining to outsell electric passenger cars. IDTechEx; photo by Stephen Shankland/CNET

Rising costs could slow the spread of electric power to all sorts of other industries, too, like construction, agriculture, mining, mass transit and aircraft.

Battery progress will help all these new industries become greener and quieter only if all that extra energy can be squeezed more tightly into cells without increasing risks of fires and explosions. Lithium-ion battery fires grounded Boeing’s early 787 Dreamliner aircraft, and there have been problems in large batteries for grid-scale energy storage because of insufficient testing, Harrop said.

“The industry is cutting corners in the race to get energy density, faster charging and longer cycle life,” Harrop said. “The fires will continue.”

Electric aircraft, too

Still, many companies, like French aerospace giant Airbus and US rival Boeing, believe batteries are coming.

Startup Ampaire is banking on a hybrid aircraft that marries conventional fuel-powered engines with battery-powered motors for propeller-powered aircraft common on short-haul routes. They’ll be much quieter at takeoff and will cut fuel use, a major constraint for short flights that are canceled when fuel costs increase, said Pete Savagian, the company’s senior vice president of engineering.

A larger scale hybrid due in 2021, the Airbus E-Fan X prototype jet will swap out one of its four conventional jet engines with a 2-megawatt electric motor, said Bruno Samaniego López, a power and electrical engineering leader at the company. A new single-aisle jet with 20MW of electrical power is planned after that, he adds.

“We are very committed to this ambitious path of electrification,” Samaniego López said. “It is happening, and it will be the future.”

Source: https://www.cnet.com/roadshow/news/better-battery-tech-could-boost-ev-range-speed-up-charging/

Iconic Minerals $ICM.ca – #Lithium Ion #Battery Market Growth Factors, Demand and Trends $LI.ca $MGG.ca $PAC.ca $CYP.ca $NEV.ca $SX.ca Forecast

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 2:00 PM on Monday, November 25th, 2019

SPONSOR: Iconic Minerals Ltd. ICM:TSX-V Bonnie Claire Lithium Property hosts Inferred resource of 11.8 billion pounds of lithium carbonate equivalent and has the potential to be the largest lithium resource globally. Learn More.

Lithium Ion Battery Market Growth Factors, Demand and Trends Forecast

  • In recent years, the growth in the industrial automation has been highly eye-catching
  • This has been particularly beneficial for the development of the global lithium ion battery market for the application of material handling equipment
  • Global lithium ion battery market is driven by the growing penetration of smartphones, tablets, PCs, power tools, and digital cameras
  • Also witnessing an increase from the flourishing automobile industry

By: tmrresearch

Lithium Ion Battery Market – Snapshot

Lithium ion batteries are a type of rechargeable batteries that have high energy density. These batteries have a very wide range of application. However, primarily these lithium ion batteries are used in portable devices and equipment. The global lithium ion battery market is expected to witness a considerable growth over the course of the given forecast period with a considerable rise in the use of tablets, PC, smartphones, digital camera, and other power tools. These batteries have gained immense popularity in recent years, especially in the automobile production sector as they provide a solid alternative to the nickel metal batteries that are primarily used in manufacturing of electric cars. Another reason for their growing use is because of their light weight and small size that make them an ideal fit for a wide range of applications.

In recent years, the growth in the industrial automation has been highly eye-catching. This has been particularly beneficial for the development of the global lithium ion battery market for the application of material handling equipment. Over the years, several technological advancements have brought considerable growth in the material handling equipment sector. Some of the highly popular material handling equipment are automated guided vehicles, intralogistics systems, industrial trucks, and elevating equipment. Interestingly, all of these machine handling equipment are battery operated. With lithium ion’s stronger energy density, long lasting power, compact size, and light weight, these batteries are the most preferred option to be fitted across the equipment. Naturally, this has helped in the development of the global lithium ion battery market.

Lithium-ion batteries are rechargeable batteries that have high energy density and are used extensively in portable equipment. The global lithium ion battery market is driven by the growing penetration of smartphones, tablets, PCs, power tools, and digital cameras. The demand for Li-ion batteries is also witnessing an increase from the flourishing automobile industry. The demand for electric vehicles is increasing and with it, the demand for lithium ion batteries. The popularity of these batteries is increasing among automobile manufacturers as they are small in size and light in weight as compared to nickel metal batteries.

The lithium ion battery market is greatly fragmented with a large number of domestic players. These domestic players are accounting for a high share in the lithium ion battery market. There are small, medium, and large scale players in the industry and this is the reason behind the extreme competitive environment within the global lithium-ion battery market. The introduction of innovative and new technologies will help with the growth of the market. Many players are also investing in research and development and this will trigger increased competition among existing players. Product launches are a key strategy adopted by players in the industry. The lithium ion battery market players are also adopting the strategy of mergers and acquisitions so as to gain competitive edge and increase their customer base.

Global Lithium Ion Battery Market: Overview

Lithium-ion batteries are rechargeable batteries, in which lithium ions move from positive electrode to negative electrode during charging and back when discharging. These batteries are commonly used in consumer electronics. They make use of an intercalated lithium compound as an electrode material, compared to the metallic lithium used in a non-rechargeable lithium battery.  Besides that, their popularity is growing rapidly across sectors such as military, automotive, aerospace, and industrial.

Global Lithium Ion Battery Market: Key Trends

The various advantages offered by lithium ion batteries such as lightweight, rechargeable, environment-friendliness, high energy density, and no memory effect are boosting their adoption in smartphones, tablets, and automobiles. Hence, the proliferation of smartphones and tablets is providing a fillip to the global lithium ion battery market. Moreover, the escalating need for efficient and green solutions for power supply and energy storage is augmenting the market. Traditional batteries such as nickel-metal-hybrid, lead-acid, and sodium-sulfur have hazardous effects on the environment. In addition, the rising production of hybrid electric vehicles and electrical vehicles is creating a staggering volume of demand for these batteries in the automotive sector.

On the flip side, the higher cost of lithium ion batteries as compared to traditional batteries is limiting their widespread adoption. Furthermore, the risk of overheating and a subsequent fire associated with these batteries can pose a major threat to cars and other electronic devices, which in turn is restricting the lithium ion battery market from realizing its utmost potential.

Global Lithium Ion Battery Market: Market Potential

Several players in the global lithium-ion battery market are aiming at expanding their lithium ion battery facilities to enhance their visibility in the market. A case in point is Utility San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E) and AES Energy Storage, a subsidiary of Automotive Energy Supply Corporation, which in February 2017, inaugurated their new energy storage facility in Escondido, California, which they claim to be the world’s largest lithium-ion battery energy storage site. The capacity of this system is 30MW/120MWh and has the ability to store energy for the equivalent of 20,000 customers for four hours. Such steps taken by players are likely to scale up energy storage capacity and drive the market over the coming years.

Global Lithium Ion Battery Market: Regional Outlook

The segments covered in the lithium ion battery market report on the basis of geography are Asia Pacific, Latin America, North America, Europe, and the Middle East and Africa. Asia Pacific is expected to represent a sizeable share in the market throughout the review period. The domicile of a large number of key manufacturers is providing an edge to the region over other regions. Countries such as India, China, Singapore, Australia, and Japan will be sights of high growth in APAC. The growth of the lithium ion battery market in these countries can be attributed to the increasing regulations to reduce the carbon footprint and lead pollution.

North America will be a prominent lithium ion battery market during the same period. The increasing sales of electric vehicles along with the burgeoning demand for high-quality consumer electronics products are contributing to the growth of the region.

Global Lithium Ion Battery Market: Competitive Landscape

The global lithium ion battery market is highly consolidated in nature. Strict regulatory framework for the manufacturing of conventional batteries is attracting new players to invest in the market. The influx of new manufacturers is likely to make this market fragmented over the coming years. However, prominent players offer stiff competition to new entrants due to their competitive advantage in their terms of strong foothold and easy access to raw materials.

Research and development activities are expected to be the top priority for the majority of players to increase their shares in the market. Some of the key companies operating in the global lithium ion battery market are LG Chemical Power, Johnson Controls, Hitachi Chemical, Panasonic, Samsung, Toshiba, Sony, and AESC.

Source: https://statsflash.com/lithium-ion-battery-market-growth-factors-demand-and-trends-forecast-to-2025/420030/

LOMIKO $LMR.ca #Graphene Technology Finally Grows Up $CJC.ca $SRG.ca $NGC.ca $LLG.ca $GPH.ca $NOU.ca $DNI.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-Eric at 11:42 AM on Friday, August 16th, 2019

SPONSOR: Lomiko Metals LMR:TSX-V – A Canadian exploration-stage company discovered high-grade graphite at its La Loutre Property in Quebec and is working toward a Pre-Economic Assessment (PEA) that will increase its current indicated resource of 4.1 Mt of 6.5% Cg to over 10 Mt of 10%+ Cg through a 21 hole program at the Refractory Zone. Click Here For More Information

The emergence of graphene technology back in 2004 sent physicists and electronics engineers into euphoric spasms about its operational potential.

 But as always with ground-breaking, technologies that old bean-counting devil called financial viability raised its head when it came to integrating graphene into commercial applications. 

Challenges With Graphene

One of the problems during those pioneering days was the fact the graphene technology had so many varied and attractive properties and this meant it’s possible applications were numerous, to say the least.

However, in the enthusiastic rush to use the technology pragmatism took a back seat and some developers drastically overlooked the practical challenges in applying graphene to certain commercial areas.

But those days are disappearing and graphene is starting to fulfil its promises in a whole raft of applications from both technical and financial perspectives.

Graphene Technology Breakthroughs

More on those later but firstly let’s take a look at a couple of the latest and very exciting graphene breakthroughs that have a direct impact on the electronics industry. Over at the Danish funded Centre for Nanostructured Graphene at DTU and Aalborg University, researchers have finally cracked a well-known problem with graphene which focuses on how holes are made in the material. 

This may sound simplistic but the pattern of holes dictates how the electrons in the material behave and this has direct relevance to how graphene can be designed into certain applications. 

graphene nanotechnology

For years the nub of the problem has been that making the incredibly tiny nanoscale holes in graphene can cause contamination in the material which detrimentally alters its operational characteristics. 

However, the team of scientists at the Centre have solved that problem by encapsulating the graphene inside another two-dimensional material, hexagonal boron nitride. This is a non-conductive material that can protect graphene’s properties. 

Electron beam lithography was used to create the pattern in the protective layer of boron nitride and graphene. And to give you some idea of just how complex this work is the holes have a diameter of about 20 nanometres and there are only 12 nanometres space between them. Don’t forget, one nanometre is a billionth of a metre, or put another way a human hair is approximately 80,000 nanometres wide. 

So why is this breakthrough such a big deal? One of the advantages of graphene is its potential application versatility, particularly in electronics but this versatility has until now been thwarted by the difficulty of introducing bandgap which is the difference between the top of the valence band, and the bottom of the conduction band. 

We know that graphene is an incredibly good conductor but without an integral bandgap, it can’t be switched off which is an essential element in semiconductor-related applications. Now though, and thanks to this breakthrough, the bandgap problem has been overcome and in addition to that, the flow of electrical current through graphene has been increased a 1000-fold. 

In another ground-breaking graphene development researchers at America’s Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have created a graphene device that easily switches from a superconducting material that conducts electricity without losing any energy, to an insulator that resists the flow of electric current, and back again to a superconductor. 

The device consists of three nano-thin layers of graphene which are contained within layers of boron nitride and this forms a moiré superlattice pattern. 

graphene material technology

The researchers feel this material could help scientists further understand high-temperature superconductivity where material can conduct electricity without resistance at temperatures higher than expected, although these temperatures are still hundreds of degrees below freezing.

Innovations in Graphene Application Progress

So what about all those applications I mentioned earlier where graphene is starting to fulfil both its technical and financial promises?

Let’s start with batteries and energy storage products. With the environmental push towards electric vehicles (EVs), graphene can now help with lithium battery technology because it can reduce electrode resistance without decreasing active material content. This characteristic translates into batteries have increased performance at high discharge rates, something that designers of EVs like. 

According to a report by IDTechEx Research graphene conductive inks are also becoming a reality. These had to prove that they offered both a performance and price advantage over carbon and metal-based products. However, these days graphene conductive inks are finding many applications in radio-frequency identification (RFID) antenna materials. 

Graphene Uses

Graphene is also proving successful in thermal applications and is doing particularly well as a thermal spreader in cell phones. It provides much better thermal conductivity to copper at a lower weight. 

SOURCE: https://www.electropages.com/blog/2019/08/Graphene-Technology-Finally-Grows-Up

Lomiko EV Battery Material Supply Strategy Includes Spherical Graphite Production from La Loutre Suitable for Graphite Anodes $LMR.ca $CJC.ca $SRG.ca $NGC.ca $LLG.ca $GPH.ca $NOU.ca $DNI.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-Eric at 11:08 AM on Tuesday, August 13th, 2019
  • Identified spherical graphite production as a key waypoint in plans to supply graphite anodes for Electric Vehicles (EVs) Li-ion battery megafactories
  • “We are at the beginning of the battery materials bull market with 91 Lithium-ion mega-factories built or to be built worldwide.

(Vancouver, British-Columbia) August 13, 2019 – Lomiko Metals Inc. (TSX-V: LMR, OTC: LMRMF, FSE: DH8C) (Lomiko or the “Company”) has identified spherical graphite production as a key waypoint in plans to supply graphite anodes for Electric Vehicles (EVs) Li-ion battery megafactories in the North American market discussed in a July 16th, 2019 release.  Testing for spherical graphite is to be included in a Preliminary Economic Assessment (PEA) which is planned for the La Loutre graphite project located in Quebec, Canada.  The development of a strategy that identifies a way to create value-added products is necessary to establish a long-term, profitable business model prior to  extensive capital outlay is crucial to the success of the company.

A. Paul Gill, CEO states, “We are at the beginning of the battery materials bull market with 91 Lithium-ion mega-factories built or to be built worldwide.  However, potential North American Suppliers of graphite materials are facing investor skepticism because graphite materials coming from African mines such as Syrah Resources are satisfying Chinese graphite anode demand at present.  Lomiko sees an opportunity in creating a stable and integrated North American value chain for North American EV manufacturers to African graphite or Chinese anodes which are susceptible to political strife or trade wars.”

Graphite Sector Analysis

The price for 95% C (purity), 15 microns Spherical Graphite is $2,700-2,800 USD/tonne, far above the price of other forms of graphite as indicated by the Industrial Minerals.  Lomiko’s Preliminary Economic Assessment (PEA) will include costs and the potential market for this key product.  In order to start the PEA, Lomiko must first deliver its second resource prepared in compliance with NI 43-101 Regulations from La Loutre.

Industrial Minerals indicates China imported 21,486 tonnes of flake graphite in June 2019, 14,864 tonnes came from Mozambique, accounting for 70% of total Chinese imports.  The principal source of graphite flake in Mozambique is Syrah Resources, which primarily produces 94% C, -100 mesh material. Increased exports from Mozambique has weighed on the market since Syrah began commercial production at the start of this year. June’s import volumes into China were the highest since at least January 2017.

In the first half of this year, China imported 105,462 tonnes of flake graphite in response to the healthy development of the lithium-ion anode industry in China.

At least half of total imported flake graphite was used in the anode industry, with the refractory sector the second largest consumer, according to market sources.

The use of large flake graphite as a refractory (heat-resistant) material began before 1900 with the graphite crucible used to hold molten metal. In the mid-1980s, the carbon-magnesite brick became important, and a bit later alumina-graphite material.  Graphite blocks are also used in parts of blast furnace linings where the high thermal conductivity of the graphite is critical.

Graphite electrodes are another long-term market for natural flake graphite.  Graphite conductors which release electric energy in the form of an electric arc, are used to heat and melt the steel scraps in an electric arc furnace. They are currently the only products with high electrical conductivity and are able to maintain extremely high heat generation in this demanding environment. With the growing demand for quality steel in the aerospace, automotive and electronics industries, graphite electrodes are also becoming increasingly popular. 

For more information on Lomiko Metals, review the website at www.lomiko.com, contact A. Paul Gill at 604-729-5312 or email: [email protected]

On Behalf of the Board,

“A. Paul Gill”

Chief Executive Officer

We seek safe harbor. Neither TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release

Lomiko Metals $LMR.ca: Tesla Battery Researcher Jeff Dahn Talks $100 kWh Cells, Removing Cobalt $CJC.ca $SRG.ca $NGC.ca $LLG.ca $GPH.ca $NOU.ca $DNI.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-Eric at 3:16 PM on Tuesday, August 6th, 2019

SPONSOR: Lomiko Metals LMR:TSX-V – A Canadian exploration-stage company discovered high-grade graphite at its La Loutre Property in Quebec and is working toward a Pre-Economic Assessment (PEA) that will increase its current indicated resource of 4.1 Mt of 6.5% Cg to over 10 Mt of 10%+ Cg through a 21 hole program at the Refractory Zone. Click Here For More Information

https://electrek.co/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2017/02/jeff-dahn-prize-e1486506458760.jpg?resize=1024,512
  • Dahn is considered a pioneer in Li-ion battery cells.
  • His work now focuses mainly on a potential increase in energy density and durability, while also decreasing the cost.

Jeff Dahn, the head of Tesla’s battery research group in Halifax, talks about achieving $100 kWh cost of battery cells, removing cobalt from cells, and more in a rare new interview.

Dahn is considered a pioneer in Li-ion battery cells. He has been working on the Li-ion batteries pretty much since they were invented. He is credited for helping increase the life cycle of the cells, which helped their commercialization.

His work now focuses mainly on a potential increase in energy density and durability, while also decreasing the cost.

In 2016, Dahn transitioned his research group from their 20-year research agreement with 3M to a new association with Tesla under the newly formed ‘NSERC/Tesla Canada Industrial Research’.

Through the agreement, Tesla invested in a new research lab close to Dahn’s group near Halifax, Nova Scotia.

We haven’t heard much from Dahn over the past few years, but we previously reported that his group has been working on additives to the electrolyte in order to increase the performance of Li-ion battery cell chemistry.

The group started filing patents on battery technology for Tesla earlier this year.

More recently, we reported on a new patent that could help prevent cell failure in Tesla vehicles.

In an interview with YouTuber Sean Mitchell, the scientist talks about his latest research and answers a few interesting questions about batteries:

Electrek’s Take

Interestingly, Tesla wasn’t mentioned at all during the interview and I wouldn’t be surprised if Tesla was off the table since Dahn has let things out of the bag about Tesla before.

A few things of note in the interview include the mention of removing cobalt from battery cells, which is one of Tesla’s goals.

Dahn is also on board with the latest projections that battery cell cost should go below $100 kWh within the next few years.

The milestone has been described as the tipping point that makes battery-electric vehicles cost-competitive with gasoline cars on a massive scale.

I also found it interesting how Dahn has a very similar approach to Elon Musk when it comes to evaluating new battery technologies. He said: “Until you put it in a prototype and you demonstrate that it’s a manufacturable item and economically viable, you can’t jump and down too much” That’s something we hear Elon say a lot every time new battery technologies are announced.

Source: https://electrek.co/2019/08/05/tesla-battery-researcher-jeff-dahn-talks-100-kwh-cells-removing-cobalt/amp/?__twitter_impression=true

Iconic $ICM.ca Announces Additional Metallurgical Results On Bonnie Claire Lithium Project, Nevada $LI.ca $MGG.ca $PAC.ca $CYP.ca $NEV.ca $SX.ca $SXOOF

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 1:24 PM on Thursday, July 25th, 2019
Logo small
  • St-Georges Eco-Mining Corp. (CSE: SX) has presented a Phase I Independent Review of its Phase I report titled “Bonnie Claire Metallurgical Evaluation and Process Development” to Iconic
  • SX has developed Nitric Acid leaching methodology that puts between 99.97% and 100% of the lithium from the sediments into solution at room temperature within 1-4 hours.
  • SX has reached the Phase 1 Benchmark which calls for the issuance of 2,000,000 of Iconic’s common shares to St-Georges.

Vancouver, British Columbia–(July 25, 2019) – Iconic Minerals Ltd. (TSXV: ICM) (OTC Pink: BVTEF) (FSE: YQGB)  (“Iconic”) is pleased to announce that St-Georges Eco-Mining Corp. (CSE: SX) has presented a Phase I Independent Review of its Phase I report titled “Bonnie Claire Metallurgical Evaluation and Process Development” to Iconic. SX has developed Nitric Acid leaching methodology that puts between 99.97% and 100% of the lithium from the sediments into solution at room temperature within 1-4 hours. SX has reached the Phase 1 Benchmark which calls for the issuance of 2,000,000 of Iconic’s common shares to St-Georges. The shares will remain in escrow for three years. Iconic has also met its other obligations derived from this agreement by participating in St-Georges’ private placement in January 2019 for CAD $100,000.

Additional details of the Nitric Acid leaching is quoted below from an SX press release dated July 24, 2019:

St-Georges’ Process: Selective Leaching with Nitric Acid

Leaching with a passivating acid normally used to clean steel and passivate the welds of stainless steel was performed in the hope of selectively removing the magnesium (Mg) and all the salt metals like sodium (Na), calcium (Ca), lithium (Li) and magnesium (Mg).

The initial results with a 4-hour leach showed that all the salt metals and carbonate formations leached easily. This follows the logic of cleaning acid and leaves most of the other elements behind, such as silica (Si), alumina (Ai), potassium (K).

Multiple 1-hour leach tests confirmed the leaching of 100% of the lithium leaving behind most of the leachable elements from other acids such as potassium (K). The only loss of lithium that occurred during some of these tests was due to the water in the filter with the solids and represented less than 0.03% of the total lithium value. It also corresponds directly to the water retained with this type of fine material. Additional trials are being performed with reduced time of contact and temperature to optimize the lithium-bearing fines leaching.

The lithium in the super fines leached completely in each test performed with nitric acid. The trials to selectively optimize leaching the lithium with less calcium and magnesium are expected to be performed in the third quarter of 2019. It is expected that calcium can be reduced partially by filtering the coarser calcium formation as per SGS results and partially with less contact time with the acid. The same for magnesium. New samples will be treated once received.

Iconic looks forward to the SX Phase II report which will include plans for a pilot plant.

The Bonnie Claire Lithium Property Characteristics:

The Property is located within Sarcobatus Valley that is approximately 30 km (19 miles) long and 20 km (12 miles) wide. Quartz-rich volcanic tuffs, that contain anomalous amounts of lithium, occur within and adjacent to the valley. Geochemical analysis of the local salt flats has yielded lithium values up to 340 ppm. The gravity low within the valley is 20 km (12 miles) long, and the current estimates of depth to basement rocks range from 600 to 1,200 meters (2,000 to 4,000 feet). Four drill holes have identified an open ended, 43-101 compliant resource of 28.58 billion kilograms of lithium carbonate equivalent. The drilling that defined the current resource only covered an area of 3.0 km2 (1.2mi2), while previously run MT geophysics show a potentially mineralized area of 27.3 km2 (10.5mi2). Drilling to date has shown strong correlation between the MT results and the lithium mineralization. The thickness of the lithium mineralization is unknown, but drilling indicates it is greater than 600 meters (2,000 feet). The current claim block covers an area of 57.5 km2 (22.2mi2). Further drilling has been permitted and metallurgy to determine the most efficient recovery method is currently in progress.

On behalf of the Board of Directors

Richard Kern, President and CEO
Contact: Keturah Nathe, VP Corporate Development (604) 336-8614

For further information on ICM, please visit our website at www.iconicmineralsltd.com. The Company’s public documents may be accessed at www.sedar.com.

Forward Statement: This news release includes certain forward-looking statements or information. All statements other than statements of historical fact included in this release are forward-looking statements that involve various risks and uncertainties. There can be no assurance that such statements will prove to be accurate and actual results and future events could differ materially from those anticipated in such statements. Iconic expressly disclaims any intention or obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise except as otherwise required by applicable securities legislation.

Neither the TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.

St-Georges Eco-Mining Corp. $SX.ca $SXOOF Independent Review of Phase One #Lithium in Clay R&D Completed $NNX.ca $OM.ca $ICM.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-JC at 3:11 PM on Wednesday, July 24th, 2019
Sx large
  • Received the Independent Review of its Phase I report titled “Bonnie Claire Metallurgical Evaluation and Process Development.”
  • Delivery of the current Independent Review Report constitutes the conclusion of the Stage 1 Benchmark and calls for the issuance of 2,000,000 of Iconic’s common shares to St-Georges.
  • Iconic has also met its other obligations derived from this agreement by participating in St-Georges’ private placement in January 2019 for CAD $100,000.

Montreal,  July 24, 2019 – St-Georges Eco-Mining Corp. (CNSX:SX.CN) (OTC:SXOOF) (FSE:85G1) is pleased inform its shareholders that it has received the Independent Review of its Phase I report titled “Bonnie Claire Metallurgical Evaluation and Process Development.” The Company has communicated this information to its client, Iconic Minerals (TSX-V: ICM).

In December 2017, the Company entered into an agreement with Iconic Minerals ltd that called for St-Georges to develop an extraction process that would allow Iconic to economically exploit the lithium resources discovered at Iconic’s 100% owned Bonnie Claire lithium deposit. (For details, please refer to St-Georges’ Press Release dated December 7, 2017). The agreement has three delivery milestones. The delivery of the current Independent Review Report constitutes the conclusion of the Stage 1 Benchmark and calls for the issuance of 2,000,000 of Iconic’s common shares to St-Georges. Iconic has also met its other obligations derived from this agreement by participating in St-Georges’ private placement in January 2019 for CAD $100,000.

St-Georges’ Research & Development Vice-President, Enrico Di Cesare commented: “(…) The development team is looking forward to progressing the technology further (…) knowing that the process works and can be independently executed is very encouraging. We are currently able to leach between 99.97% and 100% of the lithium in solution (…) the only improvement possible at this stage is to reduce processing time and the size of the feedstock with improved concentration. significantly improve what was developed in Phase I, covered by this report. (…) We are designing the pilot plant to keep a maximum of flexibility to improve the initial steps of the process. (…) We are looking forward to the big challenge that putting a 25t/w pilot plant in place represents for us. (…) The reception we have had from the local communities approached is very positive. People understand the need to produce lithium at low costs, and they embrace our commitment to green technology. The government support we have received until now is beyond what we would have normally expected. (…) We are now at the stage to increase and formalize our relationships with higher-learning and public R&D entities. We are hopeful that it will allow for even more innovation down the road (…)”

Summary of the Report

The objective of the process development by St-Georges Eco-Mining ltd was to recover lithium from the Bonnie Claire deposit.

SGS Lakefield Laboratory performed an elemental analysis and crystalline analysis of the material that was received. The results indicated that the lithium was in a spodumene (LiAlSi2O6) crystal form, and no chlorides were present. This suggests that the lithium is not the residue of brines from a land-locked salt lake.

Recovery of lithium was tried with water, sulphuric acid, hydrochloric acid, and mixed acid leaching. All obtained poor results at room temperature and no pressure. Best results were at higher temperatures for sulphuric acid, indicating a high-pressure roasting was required for this material. This is standard for this mineral but not practical at these concentrations. Sulphuric acid with high temperature, pressure, and roasting at concentrations of 0.1% lithium or 0.2% lithium (after air classification) is not practical.

Nitric acid was tried for selective leaching with positive results. At low temperature and with no pressure, 100% of the lithium was put into solution while avoiding the leaching of metals and most of the other elements. Other leached materials were carbonates (1/2 of the present iron was found under carbonate form) and salts (Mg, Ca including sodium and lithium). With the expected mined volume of over 7 million tons annually for 20,000 tons of lithium hydroxide produced, this type of leaching strategy could help keep capital costs down by, amongst other things, allowing for the design of a low-cost leach tank.

Concentration methods were tested with early-stage results that call for further tweaking and calibration. The air classification trials were able to remove half of the gangue. The report delivered to Iconic contains a separate independent report in which these tests were independently performed and validated by Netzsch GmbH. The trials will be continued with a focus on optimizing de-agglomeration and on crystal form optimization. Flotation trials were not conclusive at this early stage. The selective leaching results allowed the Company to plan additional developments in Phase II. The use of resin for the purification of the lithium might be pursued on the resulting leached material and in a parallel extensive test with an electrolysis pilot plant to be set up to provide the industry with samples for market acceptance. The latter being a key to funding the project in the future.

Recovery of lithium was also tried with water, sulphuric acid, hydrochloric acid, and mixed acid leaching. All obtained poor results at room temperature and no pressure. Best results were at higher temperatures for sulphuric acid, indicating a high-pressure roasting was required for this material. This is standard for this mineral but not practical at these concentrations. Sulphuric acid with high temperature, pressure, and roasting at concentrations of 0.1% lithium or 0.2% lithium (after air classification) is not practical.

Testing Results

SGS Lakefield Laboratory was then approached for characterization and preliminary leaching trials to better determine the strategy for development and approach going forward, and to get a second opinion on the crystalline form of the lithium. An independent characterization report made by SGS Lakefield Laboratory is in Appendix A of the Phase I report delivered to Iconic.

Table 1: Crystalline Mineral Assemblage (SGS Lakefield)

Sample Major (>30%Wt) Moderate (10%-30%Wt) Minor (2%-10%Wt) Trace (<2%Wt)
Head Assay Bulk potassium-feldspar, plagioclase, quartz, analcime, calcite I/M, illite, mica, heulandite, spodumene *halite, *siderite, *magnetite, *chlorite
Clay Fraction I/M illite, (quartz), (potassium-feldspar) (heulandite) *chlorite

*tentative identification due to low concentrations, diffraction line overlap or poor crystallinity

*I/M – illite-montmorillonite mixture

Brackets indicate non-clay minerals present in the clay fraction.

The presence in clays of spodumene (the most common mineral form of lithium in hard rock lithium resources) may indicate that it has been collected over centuries in the dried lake by the erosion of lithium-bearing hard rock formations as fine clay-sized particles.

Table 2: XRD Crystal Structure (SGS Lakefield)

Mineral Head Assay (wt %)
Orthoclase 25.8
Albite 16.6
Quartz 12.2
Analcime 12.1
Calcite 10.7
Illite-Montmorillonite 5.3
Phlogopite 4.1
Spodumene 3.2
Illite 3.1
Heulandite 2.8
Halite 1.3
Siderite 1.2
Magnetite 1.1
Clinochlore 0.6
Total 100

Spodumene represents approximately 3.2% by weight, and typical crystal form is LiAlSi2O6. Lithium in this crystal form represents 3.7% by total weight. This correlates closely to the 0.1% lithium readings that have been measured during resource estimates confirming the crystalline form.

A chemical element distribution was also performed to try to predict options to create an economical and environmentally viable solution for the recovery of the resource.

Table 3: Chemical Element Distribution (SGS Lakefield)

Name Assay1 SQD2 Delta Status
Oxygen 40.3 47.9 -7.55 Both
Silicon 25.1 26.2 -1.08 Both
Aluminum 6.35 7.09 -1.55 Both
Calcium 5.08 4.44 0.64 Both
Potassium 4.23 4.27 -0.03 Both
Sodium 3.41 3.28 0.13 Both
Iron 2.24 2.13 0.11 Both
Carbon 1.41 -1.41 SQD
Magnesium 1.13 1.15 -0.02 Both
Chlorine 0.76 -0.76 SQD
Hydrogen 0.27 0.27 SQD
Fluorine 0.18 0.18 SQD
Lithium 0.11 0.12 0.01 Both
Phosphorus 0.03 0.03 XRF
Titanium 0.22 0.22 XRF
Manganese 0.09 0.09 SRF

1.Values measured by chemical assay.

2.Values calculated based on mineral/compound formulas and quantities identified by semi-quantitative XRD.

The usual form of lithium present in typical brines is easy to dissolve in water. The common forms of lithium associated with hard rock resource are spodumene LiAlSi2O6 and lepidolite K(Li,Al,Rb)2(Al,Si)4O10(F,OH)2 which require aggressive leaching with high temperature and roasting. As the economic recovery of the lithium would be severely hampered, a leaching trial was performed at ambient temperature with conventional leaching options. Initial tests have shown that high temperature and roasting would be necessary with conventional leaching methods.

Table 4: Summary of Leach Tests

Test   Lixiviant Solids Extractions (%)
Test Sample Temp Lixiviant Li Ca Mg
L-001 NV Clay Comp Amb Water 2 00
L-002 NV Clay Comp Amb H2SO4 11 15 8
L-003 NV Clay Comp Amb HCl 7 92 4
L-004 NV Clay Comp 80 H2SO4 15 14 9
L-005 NV Clay Comp 80 H2SO4 + Thiourea 40 16 40

Water Leach (L-001)

A lithium salt would normally be leached or dissolved in water. L-001 test demonstrates that only 2% of the total lithium was recovered in solution, and a total of 11% weight loss of the solids occurred. This indicates that only actual salts were dissolved in the water. A typical brine would have allowed most of the lithium and salts to be recovered in water which is noticeably not the case here. A water wash could reduce the impurities in the solution simplifying the total purification steps by reducing sodium, for example. Saturated salt water may help with concentrating lithium fines during froth flotation and may be achieved by water recirculation.

Sulphuric Acid Leach (L-002, L-004, L-005)

At ambient temperature, test L-002 leached 11% of the lithium. With the temperature at 80?C test L-004 with 15% of the lithium recovered provided the best results with sulphuric acid. This follows the logic of hard rock lithium minerals chemical recovering with high temperature pressurized leach after roasting with conventional methods. Purification and neutralization efforts are costly even with a 6% total lithium concentrate. At the concentrations being discussed, the chemical usage and sheer size of the process plant, it would doubtfully be economical.

Mixed acid was also tried with elements added to the sulphuric acid in test L-005. At 80?C, this did improve the recovery of lithium to 40% but also increased other elements not targeted to be leached. Even with mixed acid, the testing trend indicated high-temperature pressure vessels would be needed. This would be very costly with low concentrations of lithium in addition to leaching many impurities that would complicate the purification steps. The main advantage with sulphuric acid is that calcium is precipitated as gypsum, thus eliminating one of the impurities.

Hydrochloric Acid Leach (L-003)

Test L-003 was only a little better than water leach (L-001) with 7% of the total lithium recovered and almost all the calcium. In this case, it is expected that increasing the temperature would improve results, but more impurities would probably be leached at the same time. Mg and Ca leached at the highest rate with HCl (Ca remains in solution with HCl).

Magnesium (Mg) and Calcium (Ca) cause problems for the recovery of lithium with resins and organics. Conventional resins with brines typically have a ratio of 6 to 1 for Magnesium to Lithium before efficiency is severely diminished. This has led to the development of new resins to operate in less favorable ratios. In the case of using acids, the chemical costs can become prohibitive even if a resin for purification is found with unfavorable ratios.

St-Georges’ Process: Selective Leaching with Nitric Acid

Leaching with a passivating acid normally used to clean steel and passivate the welds of stainless steel was performed in the hope of selectively removing the magnesium (Mg) and all the salt metals like sodium (Na), calcium (Ca), lithium (Li) and magnesium (Mg).

The initial results with a 4-hour leach showed that all the salt metals and carbonate formations leached easily. This follows the logic of cleaning acid and leaves most of the other elements behind, such as silica (Si), alumina (Ai), potassium (K).

Multiple 1-hour leach tests confirmed the leaching of 100% of the lithium leaving behind most of the leachable elements from other acids such as potassium (K). The only loss of lithium that occurred during some of these tests was due to the water in the filter with the solids and represented less than 0.03% of the total lithium value. It also corresponds directly to the water retained with this type of fine material. Additional trials are being performed with reduced time of contact and temperature to optimize the lithium-bearing fines leaching.

The lithium in the super fines leached completely in each test performed with nitric acid. The trials to selectively optimize leaching the lithium with less calcium and magnesium are expected to be performed in the third quarter of 2019. It is expected that calcium can be reduced partially by filtering the coarser calcium formation as per SGS results and partially with less contact time with the acid. The same for magnesium. New samples will be treated once received.

Considering the results obtained, St-Georges is working on strategic partnerships for new organics mediums and resins that can work with nitric acid to selectively collect the lithium, as well as for electrolysis with nitric acid mediums. The Company also started to work on optimizing a new technology related to filter presses to reduce the facility size and environmental footprint, and to decrease chemicals usage and waste disposal. The new filter press design will be completed and available for viewing within two months. It is too early to know if this development initiative will result in intellectual property that can be patented.

Yves Caron P.Geo. (OGQ #548) a Qualified Person under the National Instrument 43-101 has reviewed and approved the technical content of the current press release

ON BEHALF OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS

“Vilhjalmur Thor Vilhjalmson”

VILHJALMUR THOR VILHJALMSON, PRESIDENT

About St-Georges

St-Georges is developing new technologies to solve some of the most common environmental problems in the mining industry.

The Company controls directly or indirectly, through rights of first refusal, all of the active mineral tenures in Iceland. It also explores for nickel on the Julie Nickel Project & for industrial minerals on Quebec’s North Shore and for lithium and rare metals in Northern Quebec and in the Abitibi region. Headquartered in Montreal, St-Georges’ stock is listed on the CSE under the symbol SX, on the US OTC under the Symbol SXOOF, and on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange under the symbol 85G1.

Cautionary Statements Regarding Forward-Looking Information

Certain statements included herein may constitute “forward-looking statements.” All statements included in this press release that address future events, conditions, or results, including in connection with the prefeasibility study, its financing, job creation, the investments to complete the project and the potential performance, production, and environmental footprint of the ferrosilicon plant, are forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of words such as “may”, “must”, “plan”, “believe”, “expect”, “estimate”, “think”, “continue”, “should”, “will”, “could”, “intend”, “anticipate”, or “future”, or the negative forms thereof or similar variations. These forward-looking statements are based on certain assumptions and analyses made by management in light of their experiences and their perception of historical trends, current conditions, and expected future developments, as well as other factors they believe are appropriate in the circumstances. These statements are subject to risks, uncertainties, and assumptions, including those mentioned in the Corporation’s continuous disclosure documents, which can be found under its profile on SEDAR (www.sedar.com). Many of such risks and uncertainties are outside the control of the Corporation and could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. In making such forward-looking statements, management has relied upon a number of material factors and assumptions, on the basis of currently available information, for which there is no insurance that such information will prove accurate. All forward-looking statements are expressly qualified in their entirety by the cautionary statements set forth above. The Corporation is under no obligation, and expressly disclaims any intention or obligation, to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as expressly required by applicable law.

Neither the CSE nor its Regulation Services Provider accept responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.