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Not Science Fiction: Can We Charge EVs With Car-to-Car Mobile Recharging? SPONSOR: Lomiko Metals $LMR.ca $CJC.ca $SRG.ca $NGC.ca $LLG.ca $GPH.ca $NOU.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-Eric at 1:25 PM on Monday, May 11th, 2020

SPONSOR: Lomiko Metals is focused on the exploration and development of minerals for the new green economy such as lithium and graphite. Lomiko owns 80% of the high-grade La Loutre graphite Property, Lac Des Iles Graphite Property and the 100% owned Quatre Milles Graphite Property. Lomiko is uniquely poised to supply the growing EV battery market. Click Here For More Information

Electric vehicles (EVs) in their current form are not practical for long distance travel due to the need for multiple or lengthy stops at charging stations. But what if they could—like planes being refueled in the air from another aircraft—get a charge-on-the-go?

The idea sounds like science fiction, but there are already technologies in use that would help facilitate specialized vehicles for charging.

For instance, Tesla cars use radar to detect the speed of other cars around them, which controls the speed of the car in relation to traffic—a feature that would make “docking” possible.

With rural electric charging stations almost non-existent, Swarup Bhunia and engineers at the University of Florida, Gainesville, are postulating that “peer-to-peer charging” and “mobile charging stations” could likely solve this problem faster than the current proliferation of charging points or battery advancements

Along with the mobile charging stations idea, Bhunia believes that if more and more people buy electric cars, it would be super-efficient if all cars on the road could share charge with one another.

The idea is bold and definitely something out of Blade Runner or Ex Machina, but Bhunia explains that, incredibly, it’s the easiest way to solve the two largest hang-ups that prevent consumers from selecting an EV—battery range, and charging time.

Cloud Technology for Traffic

“A set of cloud-based schedulers decides charge providers and receivers,” begins the hypothesis written by Bhunia et al. in a journal called arxiv that allows non peer-reviewed material to be discussed.

What Bhunia and his team are describing is a cloud system that examines all of the EV drivers on the road, where they are going, and how much charge each vehicle has. The cloud then determines, for example, that EV-A has 89% battery, but requires only 4% to reach its destination, while EV-B has 22% battery, yet requires 31% to reach its destination.

If the rerouting isn’t intrusive, the system would instruct the two EVs to carry out the charge transfer. The system would then link the provider with the receiver, and a credit system would ensure that everyone is paying for the charge they use.

Inside the given traffic network, every vehicle’s charge could be examined against each vehicle’s demand, and “mobile charging stations,” which would be large automated trucks with onboard charging equipment to fill in the demand gaps.

“We envision a safe, insulated, and firm telescopic arm carrying the charging cable,” reads the paper, describing how to get one charge into another car while barreling down the freeway, much like two aircraft during mid-air refueling. “After two EVs lock speed and are in range for charge sharing, they will extend their charging arms.”

They admit this would be just one possible way to tackle this problem. One extremely exciting thing that the team has also imagined would be wireless charging in the future, as we can already do with our phones. Imagine realizing you need a bit of a charge up, and so you simply pull your car alongside an 18 wheeler, set the cruise control, and charge up wirelessly before continuing on your way.

Volkswagen has already unveiled a conceptual design for a little robot that will tug around a trailer of batteries while charging all the cars inside a given parking garage, and if the technology could be adopted onto a mobile charging station like a truck, car, semi-trailer, or even drone, as some have imagined, Bhunia’s dream of a cloud-sharing peer-to-peer charging network is already halfway real.

Source: https://www.goodnewsnetwork.org/can-we-charge-evs-with-car-to-car-mobile-recharging/

New Study Examines Impacts of Different Sources of Critical Metals for EV Batteries SPONSOR: Lomiko Metals $LMR.ca $CJC.ca $SRG.ca $NGC.ca $LLG.ca $GPH.ca $NOU.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-Eric at 9:07 AM on Tuesday, May 5th, 2020

SPONSOR: Lomiko Metals is focused on the exploration and development of minerals for the new green economy such as lithium and graphite. Lomiko owns 80% of the high-grade La Loutre graphite Property, Lac Des Iles Graphite Property and the 100% owned Quatre Milles Graphite Property. Lomiko is uniquely poised to supply the growing EV battery market. Click Here For More Information

  • The study commissioned by DeepGreen examines how we can source the massive amount of mineral resources required for a wholesale move away from fossil fuels with the least amount of damage to the planet.

As calls for a transition to renewable energy and electric transport grow louder in the face of increasing global climate chaos, demand for certain EV battery metals is projected to increase by 11 times the current level by 2050, according to the World Bank, with shortages in nickel, cobalt and copper predicted to emerge as soon as 2025.

The first-of-its-kind LCSA study provides an in-depth comparison of the cradle-to-gate impacts of producing metals from land ores and polymetallic nodules, both sources of the nickel, cobalt, copper and manganese required to build one billion EV batteries. The researchers examine the relative impacts of the extraction, processing and refining of these key base metals on several impact categories, including: greenhouse gas emissions and carbon sequestration, ecosystem services, non-living resources and habitats, biodiversity, human health and economics.

“The purpose of this in-depth research effort is to provide a substantive look into the impacts of different sources of the critical battery metals that make up the bedrock of the clean energy economy” said DeepGreen Chairman and CEO Gerard Barron. “The scale of the green transition is monumental, and the timeline is daunting. For Earth Day’s 50th anniversary let’s go deeper than mere calls for renewable energy and electric transport and have an honest conversation about the resources required to get us there. We believe that polymetallic nodules are an important part of the solution. They contain high concentrations of nickel, cobalt and manganese – they’re effectively an EV battery in a rock.”

Gerard Barron, DeepGreen Chairman and CEO, added that ocean nodules are a unique resource to consider at a time when society urgently needs a good solution for supplying new virgin metals for the green transition and that extraction of virgin metals – from any source – is by definition not sustainable and generates environmental damage. This means there is a responsibility to understand the benefits – as well as the damages associated with sourcing base metals from nodules.

Polymetallic nodules are made of almost 100 percent usable minerals and contain no toxic levels of deleterious elements, compared to ores mined from the land which have increasingly low yields (often below 1 percent) and often do contain toxic levels of deleterious elements. This means that producing metals from nodules has the potential to generate almost zero solid waste and no toxic tailings, as opposed to terrestrial mining processes which produce billions of tonnes of waste and can leak deadly toxins into soil and water resources.

Based on a relative impact assessment of land ores and ocean nodules, the researchers find that nodule collection and processing can deliver a 70 percent reduction in carbon dioxide equivalent (C02e) emissions, 94 percent reduction in stored carbon at risk, 90 percent reduction in SOx and NOx emissions, 100 percent less solid waste, 94 percent less land use, 92 percent less forest use and zero child labour, among other benefits.

“Over the last 5 years there has been heightened awareness of the environmental, social and economic impacts of producing metals from land ores” said one of the whitepaper’s lead researchers, marine biologist and ecologist Dr. Steven Katona. “We essentially built on existing lifecycle assessment indicators work for land-based mining and created an apples-to-apples comparison for battery material production from ocean nodules. This unique comparative LCSA enables auto manufacturers, technology companies and policy makers to understand how these different sources of key base metals measure up against each other with regards to their impacts.”

While the deep seabed is a food-poor environment with limited biomass, uncertainties remain over the nature as well as temporal and spatial scales of impacts from nodule collection on deep-sea wildlife. The study provides the broader context for a deeper, multi-year environmental and social impact assessment (ESIA) being conducted by DeepGreen, in what the company says will be the largest integrated seabed-to-surface deep-ocean science programme ever conducted, with over 100 separate studies being undertaken. DeepGreen has partnered with three pacific island states for deep-sea environmental studies, mineral exploration and project development. Through these relationships with the Republic of Nauru, the Republic of Kiribati and the Kingdom of Tonga, DeepGreen has exclusive rights under the International Seabed Authority to explore for polymetallic nodules in regions of the Clarion Clipperton Zone of the Pacific Ocean.

In recent months DeepGreen has continued its push to disrupt the minerals industry and re-shape how critical battery metals are sourced, processed and ultimately recycled, through several key milestones. In October DeepGreen derived its first metal from polymetallic nodules in a processing lab, and in March, the company’s partner Allseas acquired a former drill ship to convert to a polymetallic nodule collecting vessel.

Earlier this month the company announced the acquisition of Tonga Offshore Mining Limited (TOML), giving DeepGreen access to a third seabed contract area in which to explore for battery metals with significantly lower environmental and social impact. As part of its commitment to develop these resources, which are defined as the ‘Common Heritage’ of Humankind, DeepGreen is committed to full transparency, has pledged to share all knowledge generated and is currently involved in a global stakeholder engagement process.

Source: https://www.renewableenergymagazine.com/electric_hybrid_vehicles/new-study-examines-impacts-of-different-sources-20200422

Graphene Shields Metal Pipes From Corrosive Bacteria SPONSOR: Gratomic $GRAT.ca $SRG.ca $NGC.ca $LLG.ca $GPH.ca $NOU.ca #TODAQ

Posted by AGORACOM-Eric at 2:04 PM on Wednesday, April 22nd, 2020
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SPONSOR: Gratomic Inc. (TSX-V: GRAT) Advanced materials company focused on mine to market commercialization of graphite products, most notably high value graphene based components for a range of mass market products. Collaborating with Perpetuus, Gratomic will use Aukam graphite to manufacture graphene products for commercialization on an industrial scale. For More Info Click Here

Graphene, a dynamic material made of a one-atom-thick sheet of linked carbon atoms, was previously shown to stop steel from rusting. But soon it will also see use stopping bacteria from corroding metal pipes, according to a study published in the journal ACS Nano.

Graphene can stop bacterial corrosion of metal pipes

Within wastewater-processing facilities like sewage treatment plants, microbes called sulfate-reducing bacteria often colonize the inside surfaces of pipes and other equipment, reports New Atlas. Bacterial colonies take the form of what scientists call “biofilms,” and can develop in just 10 days after the pipes have been cleaned — after which they degrade metal pipes into primary ways.

First, the bacterial microbes remove electrons from the surface of the metal while they respire (or breathe). Second, while the bacteria consume organic matter from the water, they produce hydrogen sulfide, a corrosive chemical to metal pipes.

Overcoming limits of bacteria in metal tube coating

While protective polymer coatings may be applied to the interiors of metal pipes, the coatings themselves can become degraded as the bacteria consume their internal plasticizers. Additionally, such protective coatings may become brittle over time, cracking and flaking right off of the pipe surface, after which it enters the water stream.

Because of these limitations, South Dakota School of Mines & Technology research scientist Govind Chilkoor is considering the use of graphene as an alternative primary coating. During lab testing, Chilkoor found that even a single graphene layer — measuring less than 1 nanometer thick — was highly effective at preventing sulfate-reducing bacteria from latching on to the interior surface of metal pipes.

“Graphene can be very antimicrobial,” said Chilkoor, reports New Atlas. “It can induce oxidative stress and the bacteria will die.”

SOURCE: https://interestingengineering.com/graphene-shields-metal-pipes-from-corrosive-bacteria

Battery Materials Developer to Collaborate On Battery Anode Plant SPONSOR: Gratomic $GRAT.ca $SRG.ca $NGC.ca $LLG.ca $GPH.ca $NOU.ca #TODAQ

Posted by AGORACOM-Eric at 6:35 PM on Monday, April 20th, 2020
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SPONSOR: Gratomic Inc. (TSX-V: GRAT) Advanced materials company focused on mine to market commercialization of graphite products, most notably high value graphene based components for a range of mass market products. Collaborating with Perpetuus, Gratomic will use Aukam graphite to manufacture graphene products for commercialization on an industrial scale. For More Info Click Here

 â€œThe execution of this LOI is part of NextSource’s downstream growth plan and brings together one of the best global processors of graphite anode material and one of the most prominent suppliers of graphite anode material to automotive OEMs globally,” says NextSource Materials president and CEO Craig Scherba.

“This letter of intent to partnership on a SPG plant with such established partners positions NextSource to be a significant and dominant future supplier of high-quality flake graphite to major battery anode customers globally and simultaneously gaining an immediate foothold into the high-growth markets for electric vehicles, as well as the burgeoning energy storage market that will be reliant on graphite anode material,” he adds.

As announced in October 2018, NextSource Materials signed a 10-year offtake agreement with an unnamed Japanese trading company to purchase 20 000 tpa of Molo’s trademarked SuperFlake graphite for use in battery anode applications for electric and hybrid vehicles.

NextSource’s Japanese partner is a major supplier of SPG for anode material in lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicle and hybrid vehicle applications. Its electric vehicle and hybrid vehicle automotive anode customers are global and currently supply graphite anode material to the majority of Japanese automotive OEMs.

Since 2018, NextSource Materials and its Japanese partner have been in discussions regarding potential supply chain collaboration to supply value-added graphite material using SuperFlake graphite concentrate.

Meanwhile, NextSource Materials’Chinese partner is one of the top processors of spheronized and purified graphite for the electric vehicle and hybrid vehicle markets and has verified that NextSource’s SuperFlake graphite concentrate meets or exceeds all quality requirements for SPG material for electric vehicle and hybrid vehicle automotive applications.

Its electric vehicle and hybrid vehicle anode customers are global, including the North American market and its interest in the partnership with NextSource and the its Japanese partner is to have an additional SPG facility located outside of China and close to a high-quality mine source of flake graphite to supply international automotive OEM customers.

The Molo graphite project is a fully permitted, feasibility-stage project that ranks as one of the largest-known and highest quality flake graphite deposits in the world and is the only project with SuperFlake graphite.

SOURCE: https://www.miningreview.com/east-africa/battery-materials-developer-to-collaborate-on-battery-anode-plant/

Detailed Insight into the Properties and Applications of Graphene SPONSOR: Gratomic $GRAT.ca $SRG.ca $NGC.ca $LLG.ca $GPH.ca $NOU.ca #TODAQ

Posted by AGORACOM-Eric at 9:40 AM on Tuesday, April 14th, 2020
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SPONSOR: Gratomic Inc. (TSX-V: GRAT) Advanced materials company focused on mine to market commercialization of graphite products, most notably high value graphene based components for a range of mass market products. Collaborating with Perpetuus, Gratomic will use Aukam graphite to manufacture graphene products for commercialization on an industrial scale. For More Info Click Here

Graphene is only one-atom thick in its monolayer form and approximately 0.32 nanometers in the Z-axis. This means that the third dimension is eliminated, and it is classed as a 2D, all-surface material. Put into perspective, a stack of three million graphene sheets would only be 1 mm thick

Graphene in its monolayer form is the strongest material ever tested despite being extremely thin, a strength that comes in part from its flexibility which means it is also the most stretchable crystal material measured to date. It is also 97.7 percent transparent and has an extremely low permeability rate, with even helium atoms being unable to penetrate it.

Graphene also boasts the highest thermal conductivity ever recorded, standing at 10 times higher than copper. Further adding to its advantages as a material is the fact that it has the highest intrinsic electron mobility that is approximately 100 times greater than silicon. This property, in particular, has intrigued electronics applications for the last 15 years.

Engineered Properties Applications

Table 1. Graphene’s Properties and Associated Applications. 

Source: Graphene Frontiers, Ruoff.

Altogether, these properties make graphene the latest “wonder material” in advanced materials science and technology. This has resulted in research on other 2D materials that are analogous to graphene, from hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2), transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) and black phosphorus, to silicene, germanene, and others.

The wider group of 2D materials is significant in relation to graphene as it exhibits a wider spectrum of electronic properties when compared to metals, semimetals, and semiconductors that all have different gaps in their energy bands, as well as insulators.

Additionally, combining the materials in this wider 2D group through layering results in heterostructures that possess unique physical properties of their own. This range of 2D materials and the heterostructures that can be formed when these 2D materials work in combination have a broad spectrum of applications, including electronics, optoelectronics, sensors, flexible and wearable devices, catalysis, and more.

This information has been sourced, reviewed and adapted from materials provided by The Graphene Council.

SOURCE: For more information on this source, please visit The Graphene Council.

Gratomic $GRAT.ca Receives Notice to Grant Mining License $SRG.ca $NGC.ca $LLG.ca $GPH.ca $NOU.ca #TODAQ

Posted by AGORACOM-Eric at 2:13 PM on Thursday, March 26th, 2020
  • Ministry of Mines is prepared to grant Mining License 215 (ML215) for its Aukam Graphite Property in Namibia.
  • Gratomic can now produce a concentrate of up to 98% Cg
  • Management has subsequently decided to build a 20 000 tonne per annum processing plant.

Gratomic Inc. is pleased to announce, supplementary to its February 21, 2020 Press Release, that it has received a Notice from the Ministry of Mines and Energy of Namibia that the Minister is prepared to grant Mining License 215 (ML215) for its Aukam Graphite Property in Namibia. The License area falls within the proximity of the Aukam Processing Plant and the Graphite bearing shear zone for a total of 5002 hectares (5002 ha). Securing the mining license is a critical step towards moving the Aukam Mine into commercial production.

The Company has completed 8 months of pilot testing on historically mined product and conducted an internal study on the efficiency of the pilot processing facility on this material. Through rigorous testing and adjustments to the plant, Gratomic can now produce a concentrate of up to 98% Cg. Management has subsequently decided to build a 20 000 tonne per annum processing plant. To date, 90% of construction is complete. Upon completion of the remaining 10%, the Company will initially start processing material from historical workings left at the surface when the mine last operated in 1974.

The Company has recently appointed Dr. Ian Flint to complete a preliminary economic assessment on the Aukam Processing plant. The study, its recommendations, and their subsequent implementation, will ensure the scale up of the existing pilot plant to a commercial scale processing facility that will provide the desired concentrate grades and production rates.

With respect to site exploration, in the coming months diamond drilling will resume at Aukam Graphite. The drilling will be conducted utilizing Company owned drilling equipment, focusing on areas proximal to graphite mineralization, depicted by previous diamond drilling, underground excavation and surface outcrop sampling. The drill targeting will be systematic with the expectation of producing an NI 43-101 resource estimate.

Arno Brand, President and CEO of the Company stated that “the Company will be able to satisfy all of the conditions in the Notice and proceed to commercialization of its Aukam Graphite Mine. This marks a significant milestone for the Company.”

Risk Factors

No mineral resources, let alone mineral reserves demonstrating economic viability and technical feasibility, have been delineated on the Aukam Property. The Company is not in a position to demonstrate or disclose any capital and/or operating costs that may be associated with the processing plant.

The Company advises that it has not based its production decision on even the existence of mineral resources let alone on a feasibility study of mineral reserves, demonstrating economic and technical viability, and, as a result, there may be an increased uncertainty of achieving any particular level of recovery of minerals or the cost of such recovery, including increased risks associated with developing a commercially mineable deposit.

Historically, such projects have a much higher risk of economic and technical failure. There is no guarantee that production will begin as anticipated or at all or that anticipated production costs will be achieved.

Failure to commence production would have a material adverse impact on the Company’s ability to generate revenue and cash flow to fund operations. Failure to achieve the anticipated production costs would have a material adverse impact on the Company’s cash flow and future profitability.

Steve Gray, P. Geo. has reviewed and approved the scientific and technical information in this press release and is the Company’s “Qualified Person” as defined by National Instrument 43-101 – Standards of Disclosure for Mineral Projects.

About Gratomic Inc.

Gratomic is an advanced materials company focused on mine to market commercialization of graphite products most notably high value graphene-based components for a range of mass market products. We have a Joint Venture collaboration with Perpetuus Carbon Technology, a leading European manufacturer of graphenes, to use Aukam graphite to manufacture graphene products for commercialization on an industrial scale. The Company is listed on the TSX Venture Exchange under the symbol GRAT.

For more information: visit the website at www.gratomic.ca or contact:

Arno Brand at [email protected] or 416 561-4095

A Remake of the Blues Brothers Driving a Tesla? SPONSOR: Lomiko Metals $LMR.ca $CJC.ca $SRG.ca $NGC.ca $LLG.ca $GPH.ca $NOU.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-Eric at 1:12 PM on Thursday, January 30th, 2020
The Morning Drive: The Electric Vehicle Revolution Featuring Lomiko Metals
What is the Upside for Lomiko? We are glad you asked that question! That’s why we need sunglasses.
Below is a news report regarding our nearest neighbor that has gone through the PEA and Feasibility process with the result being a Discounted Net Present Value of $ 750 million and a $50+ million market capitalization.

Please note current tonnage amount at Lomiko’s La Loutre Graphene Battery Zone is 3%-3.6% and there is 36 million tonnes in the defined area. The new Refractory Zone at La Loutre was drilled in 2019 and will add much more tonnage, but more importantly, it will increase the grade reported in the new 43-101! Please see the drill map

After a Preliminary Economic Assessment, the La Loutre Project should generate a much larger Discounted Net Present Value than our current market capitalization of $ 4 million.

From news agency Stockwatch:
Pierre Renaud and Eric Desaulniers’s Nouveau Monde Graphite Inc. (NOU), unchanged at 20 cents on 219,000 shares, has signed a benefit-sharing agreement with the Municipality of Saint-Michel-des-Saints. Mr. Desaulniers, President and CEO, puts a colourful spin on the arrangement, which he says has strengthened the social, economic and environmental development partnership between the company and the town. Rejean Gouin, mayor of Saint-Michel, is proud of the deal, adding that he is “certain that it will benefit all citizens as well as future generations.”

Matawinie hosts nearly 96 million tonnes indicated at 4.28 per cent graphite and 14 million tonnes inferred at 4.19 per cent, all of it in the West zone of the company’s Tony claim block. A feasibility study, completed late in 2018, was based on a reserve of nearly 60 million tonnes at 4.35 per cent graphite, enough to last about a generation. The study contemplated a mine capable of producing 100,000 tonnes of graphite per year, enough to support a discounted net present value of $750-million after taxes. Still, before the town sees the annual cheques covering 3 per cent of after-tax cash flow, Mr. Desaulniers will have to find the $276-million to build the mine and get it running.

For more information on the Company, review the website at www.lomiko.com, contact A. Paul Gill at 604-729-5312 or email: [email protected] 

On Behalf of the Board,

LOMIKO METALS INC.

A. Paul Gill,

Chief Executive Officer

Graphene for Physicists, Materials Scientists, and Engineers SPONSOR: Gratomic $GRAT.ca $SRG.ca $NGC.ca $LLG.ca $GPH.ca $NOU.ca #TODAQ

Posted by AGORACOM-Eric at 12:39 PM on Tuesday, January 28th, 2020
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SPONSOR: Gratomic Inc. (TSX-V: GRAT) Advanced materials company focused on mine to market commercialization of graphite products, most notably high value graphene based components for a range of mass market products. Collaborating with Perpetuus, Gratomic will use Aukam graphite to manufacture graphene products for commercialization on an industrial scale. For More Info Click Here

In the weeks since the Physics World team kicked off the new year by testing a pair of graphene headphones, we’ve received a steady stream of comments about our review and a related segment on our weekly podcast. A few people have asked our opinion of other graphene headphones, and one man went so far as to question whether the “graphene” label he found on an inexpensive pair of headphones was anything more than “misleading click-bait”.

I can’t judge any product I haven’t tried, and I also can’t judge a product’s graphene content without taking it apart and getting experts to analyse it. However, with those two caveats firmly in place, here are two facts to consider should you happen to be in the market for graphene headphones (and, by extension, graphene anything).

First, a lot of things contribute to how a pair of headphones will sound. The physical composition of the headphone drivers (graphene, PET, cellulose, or whatever) is only one factor. Others include the method by which those drivers create sound (this blog post explains a few of the possibilities, and their trade-offs); the quality of the other electronics; and simple things like how well the headphones fit over/in your ears. Some of these things are more expensive to optimize than others. The graphene headphones I tested are a high-end product with, it appears, a high-end price, so I suspect they are pretty good at the non-graphene-related aspects of headphone design – and that much of their cost comes from that, not from the graphene.

Second, graphene exists in many forms, with many price points. A lot of physicists are interested in ultra-pure, single-layer graphene, which has amazing electronic properties. This “physicists’ graphene” is difficult (and expensive) to make in macroscopic quantities. However, others are more interested in graphene’s mechanical properties, such as strength and rigidity. To get these properties, you don’t need ultra-pure single-layer graphene. You can get by with a cheaper type, which for argument’s sake I will term “materials scientists’ graphene” (this is an oversimplification, but it conveys the right feel). The proprietary graphene-based material in the headphones I tested was most likely in this category.

But even this type of graphene is expensive relative to a third type of graphene, which is cheap enough to be added in bulk to substances like paint or resin to improve their heat transport and/or electrical conductivity. As I understand it, this “engineers’ graphene” functions like a superior version of graphite, and manufacturers are selling it by the kilo (and maybe, soon, by the tonne).

I’m not trying to start a three-way brawl between physicists, materials scientists and engineers about which type of graphene is better. They all have their uses, and they all qualify as graphene. But here’s the problem: a product can advertise itself, accurately, as containing graphene even if the graphene it contains is not of a type or quantity that’s going to make a difference to its performance. What’s more, if an unscrupulous manufacturer wants to put graphite in its product and call it “graphene”, it’s hard for ordinary consumers to know the difference. To the naked eye, graphene and graphite both look like gritty black powders. You need more sophisticated testing equipment to distinguish between them, and between the various grades of graphene.

Certification is a huge issue for the graphene industry, and a lot of people are working on it. However, until there’s a strong framework for regulation, the next best thing is probably to look for independent endorsements by people and organizations who know what they’re talking about. The headphones I tried were endorsed by the co-discoverer of graphene, Kostya Novoselov, as making good use of the material. Since then, I’ve learned of a different make of graphene headphones that has been endorsed by an industry body called the Graphene Council. However, until someone gives Physics World its own product-testing lab and qualified technicians to run it, that’s about all I can say – except to add that there are some graphene products I definitely won’t be testing with my colleagues.

SOURCE:https://physicsworld.com/a/graphene-for-physicists-materials-scientists-and-engineers/

Goodyear To Launch Bicycle Tires With Graphene Technology SPONSOR Gratomic $GRAT.ca $SRG.ca $NGC.ca $LLG.ca $GPH.ca $NOU.ca #TODAQ

Posted by AGORACOM-Eric at 5:17 PM on Monday, January 27th, 2020
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SPONSOR: Gratomic Inc. (TSX-V: GRAT) Advanced materials company focused on mine to market commercialization of graphite products, most notably high value graphene based components for a range of mass market products. Collaborating with Perpetuus, Gratomic will use Aukam graphite to manufacture graphene products for commercialization on an industrial scale. For More Info Click Here

  • Goodyear developed a proprietary compound enhanced with graphene
  • The rubber is able to deliver low rolling resistance, improved grip in the dry and wet and long-term durability.

Famous tire and rubber company Goodyear has launched two new bicycle tyres, Eagle F1 and Eagle F1 Supersport utilizing graphene technology and weighing just 180g for a 23mm model.

Goodyear launches graphene-enhanced tires image

The new Eagle F1 is an “ultra-high-performance all-round road tire” and the Eagle F1 Supersport, which is even lighter, is aimed at the upper echelons of competition and will be suited to road racing, time trial and triathlon where speed trumps all other requirements.

In the tire world, Vittoria has become well-known for adding the wonder material to its tires for several years, and Goodyear has followed suit with its new rubber compound.

Goodyear has developed a proprietary compound enhanced with graphene and “next-generation amorphous (non-crystalline) spherical Silica” to create what it labels Dynamic:GSR. The result of this is said to be a rubber that is able to deliver low rolling resistance, improved grip in the dry and wet and long-term durability.

he Eagle F1 comes in five width options from 23 to 32mm, while the Eagle F1 Supersport comes in three widths from 23 to 28mm.

To produce the new tire Goodyear has invested in its own factory in Taiwan and has developed a process that allows much greater control over the construction of the tire. It didn’t share too many details, but it believes this enhanced precision contributes to significant weight savings.

Currently the new Eagle F1 and F1 Supersport are only available as clincher tube-type tires, but a tubeless tire is reportedly in the pipeline for a launch later this year.

The new tires will cost from £45 and be in shops in February.

SOURCE: https://www.graphene-info.com/goodyear-launch-bicycle-tires-graphene-technology

Researchers Develop A New Technique for Making Graphene Oxide and Implement it in Improved Supercapacitors SPONSOR – ZEN Graphene Solutions $ZEN.ca $LLG.ca $FMS.ca $NGC.ca $CVE.ca $DNI.ca

Posted by AGORACOM-Eric at 4:05 PM on Monday, January 27th, 2020

SPONSOR: ZEN Graphene Solutions: An emerging advanced materials and graphene development company with a focus on new solutions using pure graphene and other two-dimensional materials. Our competitive advantage relies on the unique qualities of our multi-decade supply of precursor materials in the Albany Graphite Deposit. Independent labs in Japan, UK, Israel, USA and Canada confirm this. Click here for more information

Researchers at the India-based Central Mechanical Engineering Research Institute (CMERI) are developing an economical graphene-based supercapacitor that can present an effective alternative to providing energy to various applications, including state-of-the-art military equipment, mobile devices and modern vehicles.

Graphene has been used in the newly developed ultra-capacitors to replace the expensive activated carbon, and the switch seems to have also reduced the supercapacitors’ weight and cost by ten times.

The team has developed a new technique for making graphene oxide, which is being used to produce new ultra-capacitors.

CMERI scientist Dr. Naresh Chandra Murmu stated that “scientists have developed a technique for producing graphene oxide. The production cost of one kilogram of graphene oxide using this technique comes to around ten thousand rupees, which is much lesser than the cost of activated carbon used in supercapacitors. We have modified the surface of graphene oxide in our research, due to which it has also succeeded in reducing its weight. We have now reached the advanced stage of making ultra-capacitors by using this graphene oxide, which can be useful in various sectors.”

Former Senior Defense Development Research Organization (DRDO) official M.H. Rahman said that such devices not only cater to civilian applications, but can be applicable in strategic and defense applications as well.

SOURCE: https://www.graphene-info.com/researchers-develop-new-technique-making-graphene-oxide-which-they-use-improving